After probing deep and hard, the Bridgewater machine votes to go with the developed world.

For the first time since mid-2007, the advanced economies, including Japan, the U.S. and Europe, together are contributing more to growth in the $74 trillion global economy than the emerging nations, including China, India and Brazil, according to an estimate by investment firm Bridgewater Associates LP….

Among forces driving the shift: a resurgent Japan that for years was a weakling of the global economy. Japan’s economy expanded 2.6% on an annualized basis last quarter, the government reported early Monday, slower than the revised 3.8% first-quarter pace but a meaningful change after years of stagnation.
The recovering U.S. economy has produced steady, albeit tepid, growth. And Europe’s economy is estimated to have expanded slightly in the latest quarter after a long recession, new reports this week are expected to show.

At the same time, the emerging world’s big guns—such as Brazil, Russia, India and China—are ailing or ratcheting back from their stellar performance of recent years. The International Monetary Fund forecasts the global economy to expand 3.3% this year, compared with 3.2% in 2012 and 4% in 2011.

Emerging World Loses Growth Lead [WSJ]

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