Bess Levin

Posts by Bess Levin

Stumpf, responding to a question about Buffett at the National Press Club in Washington today, said the world’s third-richest person dined on a T-bone steak cooked medium rare, a side of chicken parmigiana, mashed potatoes and a Cherry Coke. Buffett, 84, runs Berkshire Hathaway Inc., the largest shareholder in San Francisco-based Wells Fargo. “Warren eats a full meal, let me tell you,” said Stumpf, 61. “When the food comes, Warren grabs a salt shaker in his left hand and one in his right hand, and it’s a snowstorm. And I know a snowstorm when I see one because I’m from Minnesota.” Stumpf said he suggested Buffett, whose preference for hamburgers over vegetables is part of his folksy persona, should cut back on the sodium and get a checkup with his doctor. [Bloomberg]

By day, Brian H. Lederman works as a managing director for Swiss Performance Management & Fiduciary.* By night (and maybe also by day), he grabs women’s asses. He grabs them on the subway, on the sidewalk, while waiting in line for the bathroom, and on his way out of the club. He grabs them in the rain, on the train, here and there and anywhere. If there were a category for grabbing asses, he’s undoubtedly be the Guinness Book of World Records holder. That is to say, he grabs a lot of asses. And while most people would not be able to keep track of all the asses they’d grabbed in their lifetime, Lederman claims he’s never forgotten an ass, which was an essential piece of his recent defense against allegations that he’d grabbed one at Lucky Strike earlier this week. Read more »

Just kidding, he actually thinks the entire operation is a joke and went on CNBC to say as much, where he noted that the only conceivable way he could see the company turning things around would be if literally everyone working for it was fired. Read more »

In an interview at his Hollywood Hills, Calif., home, the 33-year-old says he is often asked about the original source of his money because his father, Paul Bilzerian, earned “hundreds of millions” as a corporate raider and has worked for decades to protect his assets from a Securities and Exchange Commission judgment. The younger Mr. Bilzerian says he received money from his father in a trust but declines to say how much or what role it had in kick-starting his career, gambling. That career has been lucrative, by his account: He says he earned $50 million playing poker in a recent stretch of 12 or 14 months…Now his antics with cars, guns and women wearing bikinis (or less) have helped him attract more than 4.5 million followers on Instagram. Many of his escapades are bawdy. In an April video that went viral, Mr. Bilzerian was seen throwing a naked porn actress off the roof of his home and into a pool, in a photo shoot for Hustler magazine. She was injured and threatened to sue, bringing a sarcastic reply from a lawyer for Mr. Bilzerian. Mr. Bilzerian has publicly recounted how he suffered a heart attack in his 20s after a five-day binge of sex, drugs and gambling. [WSJ, @danbilzerian (NSFW unless you work at Hustler)]

The disembowling would have been swift. Read more »

…or whatever your friends have registered for in lieu of a KitchenAid Artisan Stand Mixer and towels. Read more »

  • 16 Sep 2014 at 11:47 AM

Layoffs Watch ’14: Bank of America

Cuts are said to have begun at the House ‘o Bri-Moy. Read more »

The world’s biggest banks are overhauling how they trade currencies to regain the trust of customers and preempt regulators’ efforts to force changes on an industry tarnished by allegations of manipulation. Barclays Plc, Deutsche Bank AG, Goldman Sachs Group Inc., Royal Bank of Scotland Group Plc and UBS AG, which together account for 43 percent of foreign-exchange trading by banks, are introducing measures to make it harder for dealers to profit from confidential customer information and take advantage of clients in the largely unregulated $5.3 trillion-a-day currency market, according to people with knowledge of the changes. Banks have capped what employees can charge for exchanging currencies, limited dealers’ access to information about customer orders, banned the use of online chat rooms and pushed trades onto electronic platforms, according to the people, who asked not to be identified because they weren’t authorized to discuss their firms’ practices. [Bloomberg]