Banks

UBSSince 2011, UBS has openly discussed/threatened the possibility of moving out of its building Stamford, CT, which houses the world’s largest trading floor, to points unknown in New York City. The thinking behind the relocation was that the bank’s morale and profit issues boiled down to people not wanting to work in Connecticut, and that everything would turn around should they find themselves further south. Recently, though, UBS hasn’t said much at all re: leaving the Nutmeg state, which makes this turn of events slightly awkward: Read more »

Lloyd Blankfein Gary CohnGoldman commissioned its own study re: certain allegations of gender discrimination and the results show there’s a lot that went over Cristina Chen-Oster and Shanna Orlich’s heads. Read more »

  • 22 Oct 2014 at 4:01 PM

That’s ‘Professor Dimon,’ Thank You Very Much

After beating cancer, Jamie Dimon — like many survivors — is looking to give back after a life in banking. The 56-year-old JPMorgan Chase chief executive is considering philanthropy and teaching when he leaves the bank he’s helmed for 10 years, he said during his first public appearance in New York since finishing the cancer treatment last month. “I still want to make it a better world,” he said Tuesday at the Javits Center for an industry conference. “I think when I’m done with this, I’m going to do it more directly.” [NYP]

rbsIf you’re going to team up with other banks to manipulate interest rates and engage in other shady behavior, just make sure to be the first one to go to regulators and let them know what you’ve all been up to. Read more »

ubs1When Christie’s auctioned off Edgar Degas’s “Danseuses” for nearly $11 million in 2009, the catalog noted that the masterpiece was being sold as part of a restitution agreement with the “heirs of Ludwig and Margret Kainer,” German Jews whose vast art collection was seized by the Nazis in the years leading up to World War II. But now a dozen relatives of the Kainers are stepping forward to object. Not only did they fail to benefit from that sale, they say they were never even told about it, or any other auctions of works once owned by the couple, including pieces by Monet and Renoir. It turns out that the Kainer “heir” that has for years collected proceeds from these sales and other restitutions, including war reparations from the German government, is not a family member but a foundation created by Swiss bank officials. In lawsuits filed in New York and Switzerland, the Kainer relatives contend that officers of the bank — now part of the global banking giant UBS — never made a diligent effort to find them, and worse, used the family name to create a “sham” foundation ostensibly organized to support the health and education of Jewish youth but actually formed, they say, to cheat them out of their inheritance. [NYT via Matt]

Goldman Sachs Just Wants A Winner

Assessing the cost of the place.Lloyd Blankfein may have a direct line to the Big Guy Upstairs, but he seems to have been withholding some crucial information in recent years, based on certain bets made by GS. That Romney character is not President of the United States, Goldman’s best check-writing efforts notwithstanding, and Brazil is rather emphatically not sporting a sixth star on their soccer jerseys these days. But if the polls are right—and, really, when are they not?—Goldman won’t be backing the wrong horse this time around. Read more »

Bonus Watch ’14: Goldman Sachs

Thanks, guys.The Little Lloyds won’t be getting as much of that extra 25% in revenue the bank earned last quarter, but they’ll do alright. Read more »

Government auditors are investigating exclusive contracts held by Bank of America Corp. and JPMorgan Chase & Co. to provide financial services inside federal prisons…Bank of America has been paid at least $76.3 million by Treasury to manage inmates’ accounts, money transfers, email service and other technology inside the 121 facilities managed by the Federal Bureau of Prisons. The contract has been amended 22 times since it was awarded without competitive bidding in 2000. The accounts hold the money inmates earn from prison jobs paying as little as 12 cents an hour and supplemental funds sent by family and friends. Inmates use the money for clothing, phone calls, food and other expenses. Treasury says the payments to Bank of America were reimbursed by the Department of Justice, the Bureau of Prisons’ parent agency. JPMorgan issues debit cards to inmates when they are released that contain the balance remaining in their prison accounts. JPMorgan’s original contract was awarded in 1998 and amended at least 14 times. It was re-upped in 2008 and amended at least four times since then. [Center For Public Integrity]