Banks

On Tuesday afternoon, an article appeared over at the Times that referred to Lloyd Blankfein as the “former” CEO of Goldman Sachs. As Blankfein is very much the current chief executive, a correction was issued.

…teeing the bank up for the deployment of some corporate Twitter account sass. Read more »

  • 16 Apr 2014 at 9:58 AM

Who Wants To Buy A Las Vegas Resort?

As some of you may recall, Deutsche Bank owns a casino1 (and hotel) in Las Vegas called The Cosmopolitan. If it seems out of character2 for the Germans to be proprietors of an establishment whose motto is “Just the right amount of wrong,” where people lay scantily clad around a pool by day and gorge themselves on food and drink before vomiting while waiting in line to get into a club by night, that’s because Deutsche only meant to get into the business of funding the project, not running it. Unfortunately, in 2008 the original developer, Ian Bruce Eichner, had to go and default on his loans, and when it became apparent that no one else wanted to invest in the place, the bank decided to just finish the thing itself, spending an addition $3 billion that went towards things like “a three-story crystal-strewn bar meant to evoke the inside of a chandelier.” Anyway, the resort has been been making slightly more money than in earlier years (while still “post[ing] net losses of around $100 million every year since opening”) and management has decided that as much fun as its been owning an in-house nightclub called “Rose. Rabbit. Lie.”, it’s time to sell. Read more »

Ex-SAC Capital PM Mike Steinberg seemed pretty surprised when he was found guilty of insider trading.

Ms. Williams recalled the day when Michael S. Steinberg, a portfolio manager at the hedge fund SAC Capital Advisors, was brought before a Manhattan judge to be read the insider trading charges against him. The police escorted him, in handcuffs, into the Lower Manhattan courthouse through the main elevators rather than the usual back way leading into the courtroom. When Mr. Steinberg emerged from the main elevators, there was a look of utter shock on his face. “Being caught is so out of their wildest dreams,” she said.

Danielle Chiesi was a vision in pink. Read more »

  • 14 Apr 2014 at 10:13 AM

Layoffs Watch ’14: Citi

The House of Corbat has asked a few employees to turn in their ID badges and not come back, unless they’re looking to open a checking account, in which case, mi casa es su casa. Read more »

JPMorgan Chase & Co., the biggest U.S. bank by assets, had a “tin ear” when dealing with regulators before settling probes into mortgage lapses and trading losses, Chief Executive Officer Jamie Dimon said. “Our response generally was, ‘We know what we’re doing,’” Dimon wrote today in a letter to the New York-based bank’s investors. “Well, we should have done more self-examination. We need to be better listeners.” [...] The bank missed signals when rivals faced scrutiny and must “do a better job at examining critiques of others so we can learn from other people’s mistakes, too,” he said. [Bloomberg]

Kai Lew was allegedly a little too open with the Monetary Authority of Singapore. Read more »

Deutsche Bank AG was ordered to give four traders fired in a rate-rigging investigation their exact jobs back while a court is hearing an appeals bid by the lender over the issue. The lender must pay a penalty equal to the men’s monthly salary unless it reinstates them in their original positions, Frankfurt Labor Appeals Court spokesman Wolfram Henkel said in an interview today…The Frankfurt Labor Court ruled last year the terminations were illegal and the bank must reinstate the employees, who made submissions for Euribor and Swiss Franc Libor. The court found “indications” that the fired staff wrongfully took derivatives trading positions into account when deciding what rates to submit. While it’s against bank rules to fix rates, the lender couldn’t use this as a reason to fire them because it didn’t have sufficient guidelines on rate submissions, didn’t control the process, and had systems in place that fostered the behavior, the court wrote in the judgment. [Bloomberg]

Like the elderly couple that has money in the bank but nevertheless scrimps and saves every last scrap of food because they lived through the depression, flashbacks to John Thain skipping board meetings to powwow with decorators to select the finest drapes and trashcans money could buy keeps Greg Fleming in check. Read more »