AIG

Septebmer 24, 2013: “The uproar over bonuses was intended to stir public anger, to get everybody out there with their pitch forks and their hangman nooses, and all that–sort of like what we did in the Deep South [decades ago]. And I think it was just as bad and just as wrong.” October 11, 2013 “The vilification of a person or a group of people is not right. It’s never right, and when it happens it should not be trivialized or dismissed lightly, as it too often was in the context of AIG. And when I referred to the South, I unintentionally trivialized a horrible legacy of our country. That was the opposite of my intent.”

The uproar over bonuses “was intended to stir public anger, to get everybody out there with their pitch forks and their hangman nooses, and all that–sort of like what we did in the Deep South [decades ago]. And I think it was just as bad and just as wrong.” [MoneyBeat via DI]

His and Snowflake’s hands are clean. Read more »

Snowflake Greenberg may yet suffer the indignity of seeing his beloved master stripped, in his prime at 88, of his right to run public companies. Read more »

  • 17 Jun 2013 at 6:06 PM

AIG Turns Lemons Into Potentially Lucrative IPO

Normally, late payments and delayed closing dates are bad news for a seller. But the systemically-important AIG’s on a winning streak lately and isn’t going to led the tardiness of a Chinese consortium get it down. Read more »

There’s an alternative theory of the 2007-2008 financial crisis in which it was just a minor hiccup that would have worked out fine for all concerned if the meddling U.S. government hadn’t been so trigger-happy in bailing out basically sound but momentarily embarrassed financial institutions.1 I mean, you probably won’t actually run into anyone who believes this theory, because it is a pretty loony theory. And yet! It keeps coming up in court, which I guess means the courts are full of loonies, QED.

Obviously Hank Greenberg is the most vocal and delightful proponent of this theory, since he’s been suing the government for ever and ever for taking over AIG when AIG actually would have been just fine with a little eleven-digit low-interest loan from the government. But Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac shareholders have come on strong of late, with weird lobbying for re-privatization of their shares and, now, a lawsuit filed yesterday seeking $41 billion in damages over their bailout.

The theory here should be familiar if you’ve been following along with AIG; it goes something like this: Read more »

They are just a weekend away from learning what exactly “systematically important” means in practical terms. Read more »