alternative revenue streams

As many of you know, in 2010, the SEC created a whistleblower program wherein a person who “comes forward with high-quality original information that leads to a Commission enforcement action in which over $1,000,000 in sanctions is ordered” can collect a nice little payout (awards range from 10-30% of the total collected). So you can’t really blamed the unnamed man or woman who submitted 196 applications1 for awards over the last 3.5 years in an attempt to win a nice li’l finder’s fee for him/herself, but the SEC can decide to make it official policy that any future cases submitted by this person shall be used for kindling, which it did last month. Read more »

  • 23 May 2014 at 4:55 PM

Wanna Make Some Extra Cash This Weekend?

If the weather’s got you down and you’re thinking of bailing on your Memorial Day Weekend plans anyway, consider printing up a bunch of fliers with your number on tear-off tabs at the bottom, post them in high-traffic areas around your office building, and give this lady a run for her money. Read more »

He calls himself the Weed Man, and he has become a familiar presence in Times Square, standing near Planet Hollywood and holding aloft a placard that stands out even in this part of the city. “Help!” the sign, in green letters, reads. “I Need Money for Weed!” The man, Joshua Long, has become a favorite of some tourists who pose for pictures with him and stuff dollar bills into his hand. But some police officers in Midtown have taken a dim view of his entrepreneurial spirit and, perhaps, the words that further it; they have arrested him several times while he was displaying his placard. Once, he said, officers told him he was not welcome on Broadway because they objected to his message. When he asked those officers to identify themselves, he said, they replied by arresting him. In July, Mr. Long sued the city and several police officers in Federal District Court in Manhattan, saying that he had been subject to illegal harassment and arrests “while lawfully begging and promoting marijuana tolerance.” On Monday, Judge Shira A. Scheindlin approved a stipulation in which the city agreed that the police would use their “best efforts” not to roust Mr. Long or arrest him without cause. The agreement does not end Mr. Long’s suit, in which he is seeking compensatory and punitive damages and lawyers’ fees. A spokesman for the Police Department did not respond to a request for comment. Mr. Long, 30, a Navy veteran from North Carolina, began displaying his weed sign last year, roving from 14th Street to Central Park, but soon settled upon Times Square as the most fertile ground. He has estimated that he could earn about $200 during a four- or five-hour shift. [NYT via Gawker]

So, okay. A new E*Trade commercial has that day-trading baby two-timing a couple of girl babies. The one who is supposed to be his girlfriend (weird?) wants to know where he was last night, and doesn’t buy that he got busy “diversifying [his] portfolio.” She suggests he was banging “that milk-a-holic Lindsay.” Said milk-a-holic, who sort of has red hair, then pops on the screen all indignantly. And Lindsay Lohan is claiming this is supposed to be her, and wants the spots pulled and $100 million.

Lohan’s lawyer, Stephanie Ovadia, said the actress has the same single-name recognition as Oprah or Madonna. “Many celebrities are known by one name only, and E-Trade is using that knowledge to profit,” Ovadia said. “They used the name Lindsay,” Ovadia said. “They’re using her name as a parody of her life. Why didn’t they use the name Susan? This is a subliminal message. Everybody’s talking about it and saying it’s Lindsay Lohan.” Ovadia wants an injunction to force the spot off the air, and the Lindsay camp wants every last copy of the commercial.

On the one hand, sounds like someone’s being a little paranoid. On the other? Yeah, it’s definitely supposed to be her. And she does need the money. Read more »