Antony Jenkins

Jenkins, 52, is trying to revive profitability at the securities unit, the biggest source of income for the London-based firm, while wrestling with demands for higher pay from its bankers. He has fallen behind on targets he set as CEO and faces calls to outline a clear plan as he prepares to meet shareholders at the annual meeting next month…His efforts to revive profit have been hampered as revenue from trading bonds, currencies and commodities dwindles across the industry and regulators press Britain’s second-largest bank to increase capital or shrink assets to meet limits on leverage. Barclays’s full-year adjusted profit excluding one-time items as well as gains or losses on the value of the lender’s debt fell 32 percent to 5.2 billion pounds. The firm raised about 5.8 billion pounds in a rights offering in October. “There’s a feeling he has lost control of the business,” Christopher Wheeler, an analyst at Mediobanca SpA (MB) in London who last week cut Barclays to neutral from outperform, wrote in a March 24 note to clients. “The threat of an uncomfortable annual general meeting is becoming very real.” [Bloomberg]

  • 05 Mar 2014 at 5:05 PM

Bonus Watch ’14: Barclays Had Two Choices

Choice number one was to cut bonuses for a second year in a row, lose all its investment bankers in the US, and turn the place into a Gold’s Gym. Choice number two was to increase bonuses and stop the mass exodus. After many a sleepless night, CEO Antony Jenkins decided to go with the latter but lest anyone be getting ideas, this was a one time thing. Next year he won’t worry about placating anyone, mass exodus or not, and if you don’t like that you can, as his predecessor’s daughter would say, HHD. Read more »

  • 03 Feb 2014 at 1:52 PM

No Bonus For Me, Thanks: Barclays CEO

Reuters reports that for the second year in a row, Barclays Chief Executive Officer Antony Jenkins has turned down the bonus offered to him. This time around, he said that it would be inappropriate to take the money, in light of “the bank’s hefty bill to pay for past problems.” All of this probably comes as a surprise to another CEO, whose name shall not be mentioned, who thought they agreed to put up a united front re: bonus accepting in the face of legal fees, be they Libor, whale, mortgage, or alternate side parking ticket-related, and who at this moment is angrily dictating an email thanking Jenkins for making him look like a Grade A Jackass. Read more »

  • 07 Mar 2013 at 5:38 PM

Layoffs Watch ’13: Barclays

New CEO Antony Jenkins has apparently been reading the Tarot cards on Barclays and what they’re telling him is the bank is about to have 40,000 fewer employees. Read more »

Barclays Tells Hedge Funds It Can’t Be Seen With Them

Barclays’ PR-driven makeover continues, even at the expense of being a full-service investment bank. Read more »

Why would you go to Barclays for investment banking services? Like, here is what you know about Barclays:

Hey that’s super. And definitely some of the people who were ripping off customers have been fired, so your odds are … improving?

In my more cynical moods I posit that there are three reasons to do business with a bank, corresponding to three relationships that you can have with the bank:

  • Client: You trust them not to rip you off.
  • Counterparty: You (think that you) are an eyes-open counterparty; they are trying to rip you off and you are trying to rip them off and you hope that you’re smart enough to survive.
  • Co-conspirator: You’re working together to rip someone else off.

Most – not all – of what is scandalous in finance comes from one or both parties misunderstanding which relationship they’re in.1

The co-conspirator model is in some sense the most attractive for the bank. Read more »

  • 11 Feb 2013 at 3:25 PM

Barclays Just Wants You to Love It Again, OK?

Please?

After spending his first six months on the job speaking about cultural change at scandal-plagued Barclays PLC, Chief Executive Officer Antony Jenkins on Tuesday will unveil a plan that is expected to leave the bank’s strategy largely intact, according to people briefed on the matter.

But wait! Barclays can change in all the ways that it thinks matter to you and the British government, if not to its shareholders. Read more »