apologies

WhatsApp Inc. Chief Executive Officer Jan Koum, whose mobile-messaging company was acquired by Facebook Inc. for $22 billion this year, is apologizing for behavior that led to a restraining order against him in 1996. The order was granted in February 1996 in state court in San Jose, California, after a civil harassment claim from an ex-girlfriend who details multiple incidents from June 1995 to January 1996 in which she said Koum verbally and physically threatened her, according to court documents. The incidents included changing her school records and preventing her from attending college classes, according to the documents. “I feel I was irrational and behaved badly after we broke up,” Koum said in a statement today. “I am ashamed of the way I acted, and ashamed that my behavior forced her to take legal action. I am deeply sorry for what I did.” [BusinessWeek]

  • 25 Jun 2014 at 8:45 AM

Marissa Mayer Is Sorry About The Ill-Timed Zzzz’s

She might’ve dozed off and missed a meeting with top execs, but it wasn’t, like, a hate-nap or anything. Read more »

Questions from a parliamentary committee will not be the toughest faced by the former minister who moonlighted as chairman of a failing bank. Read more »

Apparently yesterday’s statement before a Senate subcommittee–wherein Dougan said that neither he nor Credit Suisse executives knew tax evasion was going on, but would nevertheless take responsibility for the few bad apples that had to ruin things for the rest of the group– was not satisfactory, particularly the part where Dougan claimed to just to have no knowledge of the practice. In order to move forward, the group needs to hear Dougan 1. Apologize for the original apology and 2. Say he knew it was going on the whole time, that he weighed in on the best way to hide assets, and maybe offer up pictures of himself on the beach thumbing through a copy of the Credit Suisse Tax Evasion handbook and sipping a pina colada. Follow through on one and two, and all will be forgiven. Read more »

“Some Swiss-based private bankers went to great lengths to disguise their bad conduct from Credit Suisse executive management,” Dougan said at a Senate subcommittee hearing in Washington today. “While that employee misconduct violated our policies, and was unknown to our executive management, we accept responsibility for and deeply regret these employees’ actions.” [Bloomberg]

  • 04 Feb 2014 at 4:28 PM

Andrew Ross Sorkin Expects More From You

Time was, Andrew Ross Sorkin looked up to the CEOs of Wall Street and the titans of the business world. Respected the names they’d made for themselves. Admired the things they’d built with their own two hands. In them, he saw father figures, in him, they saw a son. In each other, they found someone to play catch with in the backyard.

But no son stays at the father’s foot, staring adoringly upward, forever. And, in his adolescence as adopted son-reporter, ARS cast a more skeptical eye at his father figures. He rebelled a bit. And in the last year or so, he found himself questioning how much of what these men said was genuine, and how much was lip service. He tried to shake the feeling that, for example, Jamie Dimon was simply telling the public what he wanted to hear when the JP Morgan chief apologized for WhaleGate, but it was an epic struggle. Was John Mack telling the truth when he said he was sorry for what happened to shareholders? Did Nasdaq chief executive Robert Greifeld really believe he “owed the industry an apology” over the whole Facebook debacle? Was Bob Diamond truly the most “sorry, disappointed, and angry” about the revelations that Barclays had engaged in Libor rigging, or was he just sorry it cost him his job? Instead of an apology, did he really wanted to issue a simple “HMD” and be done with it? Sorkin was starting to suspect with sadness that it was the latter. Read more »

While best known around these parts as a thespian and day trading prodigy who claimed, many times, to have turned $20,000 into $489,000 in three months via his flip-phone, Shia LaBeouf actually wears many other hats. The hat of a guy who gets into bar brawls and threatens to have people killed. That hat of a guy who has Bloomberg on speed dial. The hat of a guy who knows how to get a job at Goldman Sachs. And, most recently, the hat of a guy who unknowingly rips off comic books on account of being in the zone. Read more »