apologies

Questions from a parliamentary committee will not be the toughest faced by the former minister who moonlighted as chairman of a failing bank. Read more »

Remember Frank Perkins Hixon Jr.? Made something of a name for himself when he became the first Evercore employee in history to be accused of insider trading, which he apparently did in part to raise funds to support the child he had with Destiny Wind Robinson? He may be going away for a while. Also, he’s sorry. Read more »

Apparently yesterday’s statement before a Senate subcommittee–wherein Dougan said that neither he nor Credit Suisse executives knew tax evasion was going on, but would nevertheless take responsibility for the few bad apples that had to ruin things for the rest of the group– was not satisfactory, particularly the part where Dougan claimed to just to have no knowledge of the practice. In order to move forward, the group needs to hear Dougan 1. Apologize for the original apology and 2. Say he knew it was going on the whole time, that he weighed in on the best way to hide assets, and maybe offer up pictures of himself on the beach thumbing through a copy of the Credit Suisse Tax Evasion handbook and sipping a pina colada. Follow through on one and two, and all will be forgiven. Read more »

  • 04 Feb 2014 at 4:28 PM

Andrew Ross Sorkin Expects More From You

Time was, Andrew Ross Sorkin looked up to the CEOs of Wall Street and the titans of the business world. Respected the names they’d made for themselves. Admired the things they’d built with their own two hands. In them, he saw father figures, in him, they saw a son. In each other, they found someone to play catch with in the backyard.

But no son stays at the father’s foot, staring adoringly upward, forever. And, in his adolescence as adopted son-reporter, ARS cast a more skeptical eye at his father figures. He rebelled a bit. And in the last year or so, he found himself questioning how much of what these men said was genuine, and how much was lip service. He tried to shake the feeling that, for example, Jamie Dimon was simply telling the public what he wanted to hear when the JP Morgan chief apologized for WhaleGate, but it was an epic struggle. Was John Mack telling the truth when he said he was sorry for what happened to shareholders? Did Nasdaq chief executive Robert Greifeld really believe he “owed the industry an apology” over the whole Facebook debacle? Was Bob Diamond truly the most “sorry, disappointed, and angry” about the revelations that Barclays had engaged in Libor rigging, or was he just sorry it cost him his job? Instead of an apology, did he really wanted to issue a simple “HMD” and be done with it? Sorkin was starting to suspect with sadness that it was the latter. Read more »

While best known around these parts as a thespian and day trading prodigy who claimed, many times, to have turned $20,000 into $489,000 in three months via his flip-phone, Shia LaBeouf actually wears many other hats. The hat of a guy who gets into bar brawls and threatens to have people killed. That hat of a guy who has Bloomberg on speed dial. The hat of a guy who knows how to get a job at Goldman Sachs. And, most recently, the hat of a guy who unknowingly rips off comic books on account of being in the zone. Read more »

On CNBC Monday afternoon, as anchor Kelly Evans went to commercial, the song they used as an outro contained uncensored usage of the n-word. The song in question was B2K’s Fizzo Got Flow, and needless to say, it’s a pretty colorful song. It was a few segments later, towards the end of the hour, when Evans apologized for airing the song “and for any offense that it may have caused.” [Mediaite]

Septebmer 24, 2013: “The uproar over bonuses was intended to stir public anger, to get everybody out there with their pitch forks and their hangman nooses, and all that–sort of like what we did in the Deep South [decades ago]. And I think it was just as bad and just as wrong.” October 11, 2013 “The vilification of a person or a group of people is not right. It’s never right, and when it happens it should not be trivialized or dismissed lightly, as it too often was in the context of AIG. And when I referred to the South, I unintentionally trivialized a horrible legacy of our country. That was the opposite of my intent.”