appeals

stevecohensaccapitalThe former SAC portfolio manager, found guilty in September of orchestrating “the most lucrative insider trading scheme ever,” is hoping the Big Guy can save him. Read more »

  • 05 Nov 2014 at 1:17 PM

Mathew Martoma Gets Extra Time On The Outside

mathew-martoma1Former SAC Capital Advisors LP portfolio manager Mathew Martoma won a delay of his Nov. 10 deadline to report to prison to begin a nine-year sentence, while an appeals panel considers whether he may remain free during his challenge to his insider-trading conviction. Martoma, 40, was convicted in February of making $275 million for SAC by using illegal tips to trade in Elan Corp. and Wyeth LLC in what prosecutors called the biggest insider-trading case against an individual. The U.S. Court of Appeals in New York today postponed Martoma’s surrender date until it considers his emergency motion for bail pending appeal. The court has yet to schedule an argument. [BusinessWeek]

  • 21 Oct 2014 at 12:59 PM

Mathew Martoma Still Going To Jail

martomaUnfortunately for the ex-SAC PM, a judge was unswayed by the defense team’s promise to reveal heretofore unknown details re: its client’s innocence. Read more »

Just seconds after the prosecutor arguing the appeal introduced herself, the judges grilled her about the case and implied that Mr. Bharara’s office steered insider trading trials to Judge Richard J. Sullivan, who oversaw Mr. Chiasson’s and Mr. Newman’s trial and a subsequent case against another trader. The questioning appeared to send a cautionary message to Judge Sullivan, who is known for often siding with the government, and took a swipe at prosecutors for cherry-picking judges. Judge Barrington D. Parker — interrupting the prosecutor, Antonia M. Apps — referred to Judge Sullivan as the government’s apparent “preferred venue” for insider trading cases. While Ms. Apps argued that consolidating the cases created “judicial efficiencies,” another member of the appellate panel noted the “sheer coincidence that the judge who bought into the government’s theory was the one” assigned to the recent trials. [Dealbook]

Apparently this came as a surprise to Rajat Gupta. Read more »

1. He’s not convinced the government proved he committed securities fraud. 2. He feels pretty strongly that the revelation he created fake Harvard Law School transcripts that were accidentally sent to judges, with whom he was seeking prestigious clerkships, made him look bad. Read more »