BlackRock

“A couple of weeks ago, I visited Mexico City—one of my favorite cities in the world. It’s a remarkable place, not least because of the food, the museums, and the culture, but also because of the incredible economic changes taking place in Mexico right now—both in the capital and all around the country. Every time I visit, I think the same thing: if I were starting my career, especially if I lived in a nation where I couldn’t explore my full potential, I’d try my luck in Mexico. Why? Because Mexico is finally beginning to unlock its true potential as an economic powerhouse.” [BI]

Larry Fink Expands On His Dislike Of Hedge Funds

The capo dei capi of money managers doesn’t like these young guns (and, in one notable case, not so young) spreading a lot of damned nonsense and nuisance in pursuit of their short-term goals. If this was not made clear enough in his letter to S&P500 CEOs (because Larry’s the kind of guy who writes letters to S&P500 CEOs) last month, allow him to clarify his disdain. Read more »

  • 16 Apr 2014 at 12:14 PM

Bonus Watch ’14: BlackRock CEOs

Larry Fink > Lloyd Blankfein. Read more »

Eric Schneiderman’s determination to follow in Eliot Spitzer’s footsteps (to a point) is bad news for analysts who answer their phones. Read more »

BlackRock’s paper-issuing arm issued a pretty interesting paper this week on bond standardization.1 Basically: there are a lotta bonds, and none of them trade and it’s impossible to get the size you want of the bond you want, and this could be solved by each issuer only having, like, three bonds, and re-opening them when they need to borrow more money, instead of creating new bonds all the time. Each issuer has only one stock, mostly, so why can’t they cut back on the bonds a bit?

Also all the bonds should mature at the same times, preferably like IMM dates, to make hedging easier. And to make everyone refinance at the same time. What fun those times would be. September 20, 2008, for instance, five days after Lehman filed for bankruptcy, would have been a rough time to have to refinance bonds.

The argument is pretty straightforward. Bonds don’t trade very much: Read more »

All BlackRock wanted to do was make things easier for you. It had no prurient pecuniary motive in launching its own corporate bond-trading platform. It just wanted to help. That’s how it’s become the world’s largest money manager, after all. Read more »

According to CG, there’s a desk at BlackRock waiting for the former Treasury Secretary when he’s ready. Read more »