bonus watch

  • lloydblankfeingarycohn

    News

    Bonus Watch ’13: Goldman Sachs

    A few details from yesterday’s big day.

    / Jan 18, 2013 at 10:52 AM
  • jamesgormanmorganstanleytradingfloor

    News

    Bonus Watch ’13: Jim Gorman Gives Employees The Option To Either Take Their Bonus In Three Easy Installments

    Since taking the reigns at Morgan Stanley in 2010, CEO James Gorman has guided the firm with a managerial style that boils down to telling people, more or less: You’ll get it when you’ve earned it, “it” being anything from personal space to money to his respect. On the point of compensation, last year he told employees complaining about what they were paid to either open a newspaper and get over themselves or do everyone a favor and quit. Today brings news that this year, he’s doubling down on that mandate and daring anyone to make something of it.

    / Jan 15, 2013 at 4:09 PM
  • barcapbird

    News

    Bonus Watch ’13: Barclays, Credit Suisse Bonuses To Spend Some Time In The Pool

    Like Deutsche Bank, management at BARC and CS think shrinking bonuses up to 20 percent […]

    / Jan 14, 2013 at 5:42 PM
  • Deutsche_Bank_-_Trust_Wave_Arche

    News

    Bonus Watch ’13: Deutsche Bank Is Mulling Over The Idea Of Paying A Li’l Less This Year, Would Appreciate Rivals Throwing Them A Bone And Doing The Same

    The Germans might take an ax to bonuses, cutting them by 20 percent, or they might not. According to CEO Anshu Jain, what it may come down to is whether or not other banks will help him out here by getting on board with the proposed reductions, as it would make DB look bad to be the only firm doling out tough love this year. Thanks in advance.

    / Jan 14, 2013 at 10:09 AM
  • rbs

    News

    RBS: Those Libor Fines Don’t Pay For Themselves!

    Like many of its peers in the banking world, RBS used to make a habit of manipulating Libor (among other things). And, as recent reports suggest, the Royalest Bank of Scotland is probably going to be forced to cough up £300m (and fire a couple execs) to convince the government everyone is very sorry and it won’t happen again. How does the bank, which has not had a money-making quarter since the financial crisis,* plan to come up with the cash? By 1) taking back bonuses that were already paid out to people who were involved in the scandal and 2) reducing everyone‘s bonus this year.

    / Jan 11, 2013 at 11:11 AM
  • saccapitalfleece2-260x234

    bonuses

    Bonus Watch ’13: SAC Capital

    Back in December, a bunch of recruiters made the bold claim that following the government’s charges against former portfolio manager Mathew Martoma, SAC Capital employees were, if not giving them the time of day, at least waiting a few seconds longer before hanging up the phone. At another firm, the turn events probably would have been cause for concern that the staff would be abandoning ship in short order. Since we’re talking about SAC, though, we figured not only would The Big Guy & Co not be concerned about the prospect of mass resignations but would take the opportunity to remind people that this is SAC Capital and at SAC Capital, they don’t receive resignation letters, they only issue pink slips, lest anyone be getting any ideas. So you can imagine our shock and horror to find out this happened:

    / Jan 9, 2013 at 12:01 PM
  • Credit-Suisse

  • richard_handler--300x300

    News

    Bonus Watch ’12: Jefferies Has Got Your Cold Hard Cash Right Here

    Back in the day, as in pre-crisis, bonus season on Wall Street was a happy time. Sure, you still had your miserable pricks who would bitch and moan about the fact that they hadn’t gotten as much as the guy who sat next to them, even they the guy who sat next to them was a “non-contributing zero who wouldn’t recognize alpha if it bit him in the ass,” but prior to to fall 2008, anyone who was unhappy about his or her bonus was a) quibbling over receiving a huge sum of money instead of an imperial fuck-ton of money and b) in a position to actually make good on a threat to jump ship, since firms were hiring. Now, with a few exceptions, bonus season makes people feel sad. Angry. Impotent. Like the world is out to get them. Not only has the total amount of one’s bonus come down, but many companies have decreased the cash portion, while increasing the deferral period on stock to, in some cases, almost half a decade. Then you have Jefferies. Last year it let employees decide between an all stock bonus or an all cash bonus with 25% lopped off.  This year the investment bank-cumbutcher shop isn’t even forcing anyone to choose, instead dumping a bag of cash on everyone’s desk and reminding them who loves ’em.

    / Dec 11, 2012 at 5:52 PM
  • jamesgormanmorganstanleytradingfloor-260x143

    News

    James Gorman Will Say Something Nice About Wall Street When Wall Street Earns It

    If you’re looking for a cheerleader, go bark up another tree.

    “Say you want to be out ahead of it and give a lot of speeches and talk about all the good we’re doing,” Gorman said today at an industry conference in New York. “And then some trader does some stupid thing like this guy at UBS did and he’s in jail and all bets are off,” Gorman said. He was referring to Kweku Adoboli, the UBS AG trader convicted of fraud this month in the largest unauthorized trading loss in British history…Traders at New York-based Morgan Stanley had too much latitude in the past, “what I call having an outsized sandbox,” Gorman, 54, said at the conference, which was sponsored by the Securities Industry and Financial Markets Association. “Until we can be really confident we’ve got discipline around the sandboxes, I think you have to be really careful not to be holier than thou,” Gorman said. “We’re going to be in the doghouse for a while.”

    Incidentally, this would a good time to mention that Gorman’s bonus policy instituted last January– STFU or GTFO— still stands.

    / Nov 30, 2012 at 12:05 PM
  • Vikram Pandit of Morgan Stanley at Reuters Finance Summit.

    News

    Bonus Watch ’12: Ex-Citigroup CEOs

    Just because they unceremoniously threw him out on his ass doesn’t mean the board wants to see Vikram go home empty handed.

    Vikram Pandit, Citigroup’ ousted chief executive officer, will get about $6.7 million in 2012 compensation and will forfeit some awards tied to a $40 million retention package granted last year. John Havens, who resigned last month as Citigroup’s chief operating officer on the same day as Pandit, will get about $6.8 million for 2012 and also forfeit some awards, the New York-based lender said today in a regulatory filing. Citigroup is the third-largest U.S. bank by assets. “Based on the progress this year through the date of separation, the board determined that an incentive award for their work in 2012 was appropriate and equitable,” Chairman Michael E. O’Neill said in the filing. “While Citi will also honor all past awards that they are legally entitled to, there are no severance payments. Awards to which they are not legally entitled have been forfeited.”

    Citigroup’s Pandit $6.7 Million Compensation For 2012 [Bloomberg]

    / Nov 9, 2012 at 6:19 PM
  • bonusbitch

    News

    Bonus Watch ’12: Whole Bunch Of Financial Services Employees Will Get Nothing, May Or May Not Like It

    Santa will leave many bankers and traders empty-handed this holiday season. One in five Wall […]

    / Oct 25, 2012 at 6:19 PM
  • News

    Bonus Watch ’12: Retired Citigroup CEOs

    Uncle Vik may or may not be getting a little something extra in his stocking, depending on how generous Citi is feeling.

    Vikram Pandit, who stepped down yesterday as Citigroup’s chief executive officer, stands to forfeit almost $33 million in cash and stock from a retention package unless the board gives him a payout to ease his exit. Citigroup formulated a plan last year that, based on the firm’s performance so far, would have given Pandit $19 million through a profit-sharing agreement, deferred stock now valued at $9 million and $4.6 million in options, according to the terms of a May 2011 regulatory filing and data compiled by Bloomberg. The plan required Pandit, 55, to be employed at the bank through various payment dates, most of which haven’t been reached.

    It’s typical for CEOs who resign to forfeit previously negotiated severance and to work out an alternative payout agreement with the board, said Steven Hall, managing director of Steven Hall & Partners, a New York-based executive compensation consulting firm. Pandit getting nothing would signal that “he stood up and said, ‘I’m resigning,’” Hall said. If he gets a payout, “then the question is, did they give him that in order to smooth the path to his resignation or termination? Or did they look at him and say, ‘You know what, you did a hell of a good job during a very, very rough time, we’d like to do something nice for you,’” Hall said.

    Pandit Could Forgo $33 Million as Exit Voids Retention Plan [Bloomberg]

    / Oct 17, 2012 at 2:24 PM
  • News

    Bonus Watch ’12: Half Of Wall Street Feeling Pretty Positive About Pay Day

    Now that we’re nearly halfway through October, several items on your to-do list will have undoubtedly been upgraded in urgency: scouring Starbucks near and far for for Pumpkin Spice lattes before it’s too late, and being dead serious in telling the baristas at the various locations claiming unavailability that they’ve ruined your life; coming up with a Halloween costume that’s at once slutty and topical; and discussing bonus expectations. Despite the fact that bank CEOs and people who speak on their behalf have suggested (by saying outright) that pay will come down this year, and that anyone who still has a job in 3-4 months should consider that their bonus, some on Wall Street are apparently predicting they’ll do pretty well for themselves this year and very well circa 2015.

    There seems to be a disconnect between what Wall Street execs have been reading lately and what they believe. Nearly half (48%) of them surveyed by eFinancialCareers expect their bonus to be higher this year despite recent news reports to the contrary…Of those who believe bonuses will increase in the next three years, over half (53%) are convinced bonuses will return to 2006-2007 levels.

    For those not as confident their take-home will soon revert back to the glory days and looking to make a change into a more lucrative field Bloomberg today notes that “welders top banking pay.”*

    Despite news reports that Wall Street bonuses will be down, more Wall Streeters are expecting them to be higher [eF]
    Wall Street to Cut Pay Instead of Jobs, Graseck Says [BW]
    Caterpillar’s Worker Hunt Means Welders Top Banking Pay [Bloomberg]
    Related: Layoffs/Bonus Watch ’12/’13: Morgan Stanley
    *…Though not until 15th paragraph is it noted that they’re actually talking about ‘bank tellers,’ which seems less than helpful to the audience.

    / Oct 9, 2012 at 12:35 PM
  • News

    Layoffs/Bonus Watch ’12/13: Morgan Stanley

    Back in January, Morgan Stanley CEO James Gorman sent a simple messages to his employees, who had been grumbling about their pay: STFU or GTFO. “You’re naive, read the newspaper, No.1,” Gorman told Bloomberg he would say to any members of his staff that wanted to give him lip about their compensation to his face. “No. 2, if you put your compensation in a one-year context to define your over all level of happiness, you have a problem which is much bigger than this job. And No. 3, if you’re really unhappy, just leave.” Today, in an interview with the FT, Gorman reiterated his stance and added that in addition to reducing compensation for current employees, the bank will likely be drastically cutting pay for future analysts. If anyone has a problem with that, consider applying for a gig at Bank of Mythical Pre-Crisis Era Bonuses. Alternatively, Gorman is happy to discuss a compensation plan in which you’ll be awarded shares of his foot in your ass, which vest immediately.

    In the latest sign of the pressure Wall Street is under to cut costs and address high pay levels, James Gorman, chief executive, said that staff and remuneration would have to be sacrificed as banks cope with lower profits. “There’s way too much capacity and compensation is way too high,” Mr Gorman said in an interview with the Financial Times. “As a shareholder I’m sort of sympathetic to the shareholder view that the industry is still overpaid.”

    Morgan Stanley itself is already axing 4,000 jobs, 7 per cent of its workforce, by the end of this year. In the new year, Mr Gorman said, the bank will consider its next round of cost-cutting, including lower pay and bonuses. News of further pay cuts, including potentially for new entrants at the investment bank, comes just weeks after Goldman Sachs confirmed it was overhauling its well-known entry-level programme for analysts. Goldman was said to have tired of the number of analysts in the programme who left the bank for hedge funds. Mr Gorman said that Morgan Stanley will probably keep its own analyst programme, but pay could be reduced significantly.

    Morgan Stanley Chief Warns On Wall Street Pay [FT]
    Earlier: James Gorman To Employees: STFU Or GTFO

    / Oct 5, 2012 at 11:48 AM
  • News

    Bonus Watch ’13: LightSquared

    LightSquared is a wireless venture that seeks to create “convenient connectivity for all.” Unfortunately, as the Wilbur Falcone fans among us know, it’s looking like it’ll be a dark day in hell before that happens, on account of bunch of forces working together to shut this thing down at every turn, including but not limited to the yachting community that claims GSP interference caused by LS will result in boats getting lost at sea; the National Oceanic Atmospheric Administration, which has said LightSquared “may degrade precision services that track hurricanes, guide farmers and help build flood defenses”; and the FAA, which recently put out a study estimating LS could “cost 794 lives in aviation accidents over 10 years with disruptions to satellite-aided navigation.” Also not helping is that LightSquared filed for bankruptcy in May, the company is blowing through cash faster than Wilbur’s Studio 54 days, and senior executives won’t stop quitting. While some people might take stock of the situation and decide, at this point, to throw in the towel, Wilbur Falcone’s benefactor is not some people. He’s making this thing work if it’s the last thing he does. So, what to do? Obviously a couple of miracle workers are going to be needed and the thing about miracle workers is that they don’t come cheap. Gotta spend money to make money.

    Troubled wireless-satellite company LightSquared wants permission to dole out up to nearly $6 million in cash bonuses to four of its top employees, including its interim chief executive. Recent months have seen LightSquared burn through money–it has spent $134.3 million since filing for bankruptcy in May, according to its most recent monthly operating report, and executives alike. In court papers filed Wednesday, LightSquared said four senior executives have left the company in the past six months, including its former chairman of the board and CEO. The company wants to make sure four “irreplaceable employees” stick with the company as it attempts to claw its way out of bankruptcy protection and help to make the reorganization as fast and cheap as possible. LightSquared’s bonus proposal paves the way for a “total possible cash payout of approximately $5.985 million” over two years, according to a filing with the U.S. Bankruptcy Court in Manhattan. Four employees–interim CEO, president and chairman of the board Douglas Smith; Chief Financial Officer Marc R. Montagner; general counsel Curtis Lu; and its executive vice president, regulatory affairs & public policy Jeffrey Carlisle–would be eligible for incentives consisting of cash and restricted stock units paid in shares of the company’s current common stock.

    If the executives satisfy cash preservation goals, make progress in LightSquared’s efforts to resolve certain regulatory issues and emerge from bankruptcy by the end of 2013, they’ll receive vesting of all issued stock and “aggregate incentive payments of cash up to 285% of each such key employee’s annual salary,” LightSquared said. Hitting less aggressive goals, like exiting bankruptcy by the end of June 2014, would come with smaller payouts, like a cash bonus equal to 100% of the executives’ annual salary, in the case of the mid-2014 bankruptcy exit. Mr. Smith currently makes $700,000 annually; Mr. Montagner and Mr. Lu $500,000 each; and Mr. Carlisle $400,000. LightSquared said each of the employees “provides critical services, drives performance, and impacts LightSquared’s ability to enhance value in the Chapter 11 cases.” The group has also had to take on extra work recently, as more and more employees have left LightSquared both voluntarily and involuntarily. The company said its total employee headcount has dropped by 60% in the last six months. The bonus plan aims to motivate the company’s leaders to manage its businesses and working capital effectively and maximize the value of the estate for the benefit of all stakeholders, LightSquared said.

    LightSquared Seeks to Pay Key Executives up to $6M in Bonuses [DowJones]

    / Aug 30, 2012 at 4:12 PM
  • News

    Bonus Watch ’12: Moelis

    First year numbers.

    “Range is between $40-65k. Base is $70k.”

    / Aug 20, 2012 at 3:46 PM
  • News

    Barclays New Chairman Wants Employees To Work Harder For The Money

    One of Mr. Walker’s top priorities will be reforming the bank’s image. He was known […]

    / Aug 10, 2012 at 5:09 PM
  • News

    Bonus Watch ’12: UBS

    Numbers for first and second year analysts (who are not happy).

    “It’s been two weeks since UBS numbers came out and nobody wants to talk about it, for obvious reasons. Second years (base: 80k) ranging 45-65k and heard of some first years getting around 40k (base: 70k). And they could only achieve these numbers (“in line with the street”) after firing 30+ analysts right before communication day.”

    / Aug 9, 2012 at 1:41 PM
  • News

    Bonus Watch ’12: Wells Fargo Securites

    Numbers for first, second, and third year analysts.

    1st:
    bottom tier: 45-47k
    middle tier: 50k
    top tier: 60k

    2nd:
    bottom tier: 57-60k
    middle tier: 65k
    top tier: 75k

    3rd:
    top tier: ~95-100k

    / Aug 2, 2012 at 2:53 PM
  • News

    Bonus/Layoffs Watch ’12: Barclays

    The juniorest of mistmakers have received their numbers (and a little perspective).

    “Barclays first year analyst bonuses: massive range, 20k-55k. Analysts got 20k, 25k, 35k, 40k, 45k, and 55k at top. Most groups are expecting cuts within the next few months so while some people are dissatisfied, most are just happy to have jobs.”

    / Jul 31, 2012 at 3:03 PM
  • News

    Bonus Watch ’12: JPMorgan

    Li’l Dimons started receiving numbers today.

    First year analysts (base 70k):
    Bottom tier: 40k
    Middle tier: 50k
    Top tier: 55k

    Second years (base 80k):
    Middle tier: 65k
    Top tier: 70k

    / Jul 30, 2012 at 4:55 PM
  • News

    Bonus Watch ’12: RBC

    Junior mistmakers at the Royal Bank of Canada received their numbers last week.

    1st Year (Top Tier): ~$52,000
    2nd Year (Top Tier): $65,000
    3rd Year (Top Tier): $85,000

    / Jul 30, 2012 at 11:30 AM
  • News

    Bob Diamond Lieutenant Jerry Del Missier Ended Up Faring A Bit Better In The Parting Gifts Department Than The Boss

    The bad news is that former Barclays chief operating officer Jerry del Missier is still out of a job and it may be some time before he gets a new one, on account of “investigations conducted by American and British authorities [demonstrating] he was a central figure” in the scandal du jour and “asked other bank officials to lower the firm’s submissions to Libor.” The good news is that Jer is still (probably) getting paid, unlike some people he knows.

    Barclays was mired in fresh controversy on Wednesday night after handing almost £9m to a top banker who left following the Libor scandal and after one of its highest profile non-executive directors suddenly quit, taking the toll at the top to four. Jerry del Missier, who resigned after telling subordinates to reduce the bank’s Libor submission during the October 2008 banking crisis, was reported to have been handed £8.75m cash as part of his leaving package.

    Shadow Treasury minister Chris Leslie called on del Missier to follow Diamond and waive the bulk of his payoff. “Having resigned from Barclays over the Libor fixing scandal, people will find the scale of this award completely inappropriate. Bob Diamond rightly waived most of his pay off and Mr del Missier ought to do the same,” Leslie said.

    £9m leaving deal for Barclays deputy Jerry del Missier [Guardian]
    Former Top Barclays Official in Line for $13.6 Million Payout [Dealbook]

    / Jul 26, 2012 at 2:57 PM
  • richard_handler--300x300

    News

    Bonus Watch ’12: Jefferies Wonders Aloud How Its Ass Tastes

    Jefferies set aside $870 million in the first six months of its fiscal year, enough […]

    / Jul 26, 2012 at 12:30 PM
  • News

    Whistleblowing Bank Of America Quite A Bit More Lucrative Than Working For Bank Of America

    Just something to keep in mind.

    A former Countrywide Financial Corp. manager whose fraud suit contributed to the mortgage industry’s $25 billion settlement with federal and state regulators received about $14.5 million for his efforts, his lawyers said. Kyle Lagow, an appraisal manager for Countrywide from 2004 to 2008, claimed that Countrywide inflated the value of homes to support bigger loans, according to a statement today from Seattle-based law firm Hagens Berman. Charlotte, North Carolina- based Bank of America bought Countrywide in 2008 to save it from collapse as defaults on home loans soared. Lagow’s information helped prompt a $1 billion settlement of Federal Housing Administration claims announced by Bank of America in February, according to the law firm. The sum was included in the nationwide settlement reached that month.

    [Bloomberg]

    / May 29, 2012 at 6:22 PM
  • News

    MF Global Trustee Was Just Kidding About Paying Out Bonuses To Upper Echelons Of MF Global Management

    Last month, it was reported that Louis Freeh, the trustee unwinding the remains of MF Global, would be asking a judge to “approve performance-related payouts for the chief operating officer, finance chief and general counsel at MF Global,” as well as twenty other MF Global employees who stayed on after the firm bit the big one. According to one of Freeh’s advisers, the bonuses were the only way they could retain the talent necessary to deal with this thing and would actually “quite honestly save a considerable amount of the estate’s resources,” as losing the team would mean hiring a bunch of consultants who wouldn’t have the first clue about where the bodies were buried. Unfortunately for those who went out and blew the money they thought they had coming to them, Freeh wasn’t actually serious about paying bonuses.

    “It was never my intention” to pay out bonus money to executives from the firm, Freeh told members of the Senate Banking Committee at a hearing today. Freeh committed to lawmakers that he would not distribute bonus money to current or former MF Global employees…Freeh, in his prepared remarks, said his team employs 15 non-executives, most of whom were former MF Global employees, along with the senior executives. Freeh said he has considered “a retention program” for them and added that “no formal program was ever created for senior executives, nor was any motion ever filed with the court for approval in connection with any retention program for senior executives.”

    MF Global Executives Will Not Receive Bonus Money, Trustee Says [Bloomberg]

    / Apr 24, 2012 at 1:26 PM
  • News

    Bonus Watch ’12: Sixth Year Goldman Sachs CEOs

    Lloyd Blankfein’s compensation dropped 35 percent, while his in-a-mood president got a raise.

    / Apr 13, 2012 at 1:18 PM
  • brianmoynihan

    News

    Bonus Watch ’12: Third Year Bank Of America CEO’s

    After a year of layoffs, topless hecklers, people who won’t stop yelling at him, jokes that sting, and continuing to “reap the benefits of what Countrywide sowed,” things are looking up for Brian Moynihan.

    Bank of America Corp., the second- biggest U.S. lender, more than quadrupled Chief Executive Officer Brian T. Moynihan’s 2011 compensation to $8.09 million. Salary was unchanged at $950,000 while his stock awards surged to $6.1 million from zero the previous year, the Charlotte, North Carolina-based lender said today in a regulatory filing. The figures conform to U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission guidelines.

    [Bloomberg]

    / Mar 28, 2012 at 5:05 PM