books

haroldhammAll in all Harold Hamm ended up doing okay for himself. Read more »

When we last checked in with Holly Peterson, she had just released her debut novel, “The Manny,” a book about a rich Upper East Side woman who has an affair with her male nanny. Her father, Pete Peterson, was still working at Blackstone, the firm he founded with Steve Schwarzman. Her then-husband, Rick Kimball, Jr., was still working at Goldman Sachs. Fast forward seven years and much has changed. The elder Peterson has retired. Holly and Rick are no longer together. Rick is no longer with Goldman Sachs, possibly on account of the “naked-themed” Halloween party and “series of” topless backyard barbecues, though perhaps simply because of his newfound passion for hangover prevention ventures.

Yes, much has changed. But, comfortingly so, much has stayed the same. For example, the subject matter of Holly’s latest book, which was a topic of discussion in the Hamptons this week and whose plot can apparently be summed up as “a lotta sex.” Plus! “A stock-fixing scheme.” Bloomberg reports: Read more »

It pays to be an employee at 15 Central Park West. Author Michael Gross reports in House of Outrageous Fortune, his new book about the behemoth condo building, that the average worker there made $22,500 in tips during the holiday season in 2011, give or take a few Benjamins…Not bad for tending to a tower full of influentials, plenty of whom have made Fifteen — its nickname, apparently — their base of power…Sandy Weill…is remembered by one (anonymous) staffer as being “very demanding … An automatic call is made to the manager if a letter or a magazine doesn’t arrive when it’s supposed to.” [NYM, related]

As you have more than likely heard, Michael Lewis’s 14th book was released yesterday. In Flash Boys, Lewis explores the world of high-frequency trading, focusing on a Canadian named Brad Katsuyama who left the Royal Bank of Canada to create trading platform called IEX, which “slow[s] down customers’ orders to stymie high-frequency traders,” who Katsuyama (and Lewis) believe hurt non-HFT investors. Some people, like the co-head of equity trading at Themis Trading, have applauded Lewis’s latest effort (“We believe Lewis’s book can have a big impact on complex market-structure issues that have been simmering for years,” he told Bloomberg). Others think it’s a piece of garbage they wouldn’t use as liner in their parakeet’s birdcage. Read more »

When I arrived at Taft, they lost my paperwork, so I spent five days in solitary. It was brutal, absolutely brutal. But it was minimum security, and after solitary it was like a boys’ club — and who’s my bunkmate? Tommy Chong from Cheech & Chong. I couldn’t believe it. He was in the process of writing his book. We used to tell each other stories at night, and I had him rolling hysterically on the floor. The third night he goes, “You’ve got to write a book.” So I started writing, and I knew it was bad. It was terrible. I was about to call it quits and then I went into the prison library and stumbled upon The Bonfire of the Vanities by Tom Wolfe, and I was like, “That’s how I want to write!” When you’re in jail, you have a lot of time to think about your mistakes. It was completely mellow. I played tennis three hours a day, and I’d write for maybe 12. [THR via BI]

Over at the Wall Street Journal today you will find a “Where are they now?” round-up of what “The Cast of the 2008 Financial Crisis” has been up to of late. Most of the entries mention books (Paulson, Geithner), current jobs on Wall Street and with the government (Thain, Bernanke, Steel, Dimon, Weinstein, Paulson), low-profiles and responses of “No comment” (Cayne, Mozilo, Fuld, Diamond). While lawyers for former BofA chief Ken Lewis did not get back to the Journal, “someone” close to the guy did offer this delightfully quaint update, which actually sounds like it was intended for his college’s alumni magazine or the Lewis family newsletter. Read more »

  • 01 Jul 2013 at 6:28 PM

Charlie Gasparino Is Ready For His Close-Up


[@cgasparino]