Hedge Funds

  • 29 Sep 2014 at 4:38 PM

David Einhorn Just Came Into Some Bagel Money

The Einstein Noah Restaurant Group, whose bagel shops include Einstein Brothers Bagels, Noah’s New York Bagels and Manhattan Bagel, said on Monday that it would sell itself to JAB Holding Company, a German conglomerate formerly called Joh. A. Benckiser, for about $374 million. The price of $20.25 a share in cash represents a 47 percent premium over Einstein Noah’s 30-day average trading price, the company said…David Einhorn, whose hedge fund is Einstein Noah’s largest shareholder, with a stake above 35 percent, said he supported the sale to JAB. He called the deal a “win-win for all parties.” “For more than a decade, we have worked closely with the Einstein Noah Restaurant Group to execute a turnaround plan, reducing debt and expanding its store footprint,” Mr. Einhorn said in a statement. “J.A.B. is an experienced firm that will lead Einstein Noah Restaurant Group into its next phase of growth.” [Dealbook]

Things Still Awkward Between CalPERS, Hedge Funds

Hedge funds might be feeling pretty down in the dumps about CalPERS’ decision to break it off with them. OK, so probably not, but the point is that CalPERS is afraid it might have hurt their feelings, and it’s been beating itself up about it. You see, hedge funds, it’s not you, it’s CalPERS. Sure, it’s an old cliché but it’s true! You’re great. It’s just that CalPERS has had some new experiences and just needs to make a change. You know how it goes. Read more »

If there are people out there who don’t enjoy being broken down emotionally by their coworkers as a means of ultimately emerging stronger, he hasn’t heard of them. Well, okay, he’s heard of some but they quickly adjust to the Bridgwater way of doing things after a short 18 months. Read more »

As those of you familiar with the career of Daniel S. Loeb know, the hedge fund manager makes a nice chunk of change each year through activist investing. While the boards of most public companies view activist investors in general as people who show up to their home uninvited, take a shit on their staircase and then demand to know how anyone in good conscience could live in such squalor, to view Loeb as just one of many would be like lumping Pavarotti together with a bunch of glee club dropouts.

The man, quite simply, has elevated the art of activist investing, through his trademark letters (all of which include a potent, poetic blend of sarcasm, self-regard, belittling attacks on management competence, and lengthy prescriptions for change) and delightful flourishes like tasking his best researchers with uncovering damning details about the objects of his wrath, like, for instance, that they lied about their college majors. Anyone who has watched him at work will agree: he is an artist.

And now, he’s got even more money than usual to spend on fieldwork, correspondence, and possibly skywriters who will be paid to leave a fluffy white “Just Quit Already” above various chief executives’ homes and offices. Read more »

Mathew Martoma, he of the “most lucrative insider-trading scheme in history” Martomas, is going to jail for a while, though for less time than the government wanted. Read more »

With its peso currency at record lows, foreign reserves down more than 5 percent over the last year and vast shale oil and gas resources laying undeveloped in its southern Patagonia region, Argentina is desperate to tap foreign financing. But the debt case, which stems from Argentina’s default on nearly $100 billion in sovereign bonds 12 years ago, is blocking its access to the international bond market. “Today we are in the hands of an international financial power comprised of small, voracious interests that form a real international mafia,” Jorge Capitanich, the Cabinet chief and government spokesman, told reporters in Buenos Aires. Many Argentines side with their government against a group of hedge funds that rejected the country’s 2005 and 2010 debt restructurings in which holders received less than 30 cents on the dollar. Holdout funds led by Elliott Management Corp and Aurelius Capital Management bought Argentine bonds at a discount before and after the 2002 default and have pressed their demand for payment of 100 cents on the dollar in the U.S. courts. [Reuters]

The last two years were just a warm-up. Read more »