Columbia Business School

According to this email, yes. Seems that the future business leaders of the world are just so excited to show potential employers what they’ve got that they 1) get up into recruiters’ asses more than is socially acceptable and 2) cockblock their friends from doing ths same. The lack of finesse is apparently embarrassing the school and has resulted in a list of rules to live by during networking events, with heavy emphasis on Circle Etiquette.

To: ‘ibc-members@bettyblue.gsb.columbia.edu’
Cc: ibc-board@bettyblue.gsb.columbia.edu
Subject: [IBC] Break-out Sessions with Bankers–PLEASE READ CAREFULLY

Dear 1st years –

It has come to our attention that some of you have already managed to become notorious for their willingness to elbow their peers out of the circle around senior bankers and virtually attack the bankers with questions, thus preventing other students from networking and participating in the conversation. This is never a good strategy and acting in a socially undesirable way runs a strong risk of branding you as undesirable not just to your classmates but also to recruiters. Once you feel that you have asked a couple of questions, and perhaps received a business card, do not monopolize the banker’s time by standing around awkwardly or asking additional questions. Let your classmates play as well. Furthermore, such behavior shows that you are aggressive and non-collegial, and therefore not a pleasant person to work 100-hour weeks with.

Bankers are very observant people. Moreover, it is much easier to remember somebody with a bad impression than with a good impression – do not smother the bankers with too many questions. Read more »

  • 09 Aug 2010 at 4:00 PM

News You Can Use

Stuff CEOs with cash and bring back the corporate jets and country club memberships. That’s the message of new research coming out of Columbia Business School. The study measured the likelihood of default in 117 banks and other financial institutions from 1998 to 2008. Turns out, the companies that paid executives in shares and stock options were more likely to go bust than those that simply doled out bonuses in cash.” [FINS]

  • 28 Apr 2010 at 10:45 AM
  • MBAs

Business School Follies: “I Go To Darden, B*tch”

Looking to douse yourself in a little second-hand embarrassment today? Business school follies are here to help! If the above offering from Darden doesn’t do it for you, perhaps the future business leaders of America at CBS can get the job done.

Update: Wharton has beseeched me to throw their effort into the running.

*Confidential to Darden guy– the limbo scene was pretty good stuff.