Compensation

Europe has big plans to micromanage bankers’ bonuses and the first step of those plans is to figure out how big those bonuses are. And here is the answer! For 2011, anyway, and for bankers who made more than €1mm. It’s a report from the European Banking Authority based on their data collection project, in which national regulators were asked to collect data on all bankers within their borders who made more than €1mm.

I’ve had a go at putting it into a spreadsheet, which you should play with; you might find more interesting things than I did. But given that fixed vs. variable comp for high earners is the main focus, here’s the fixed/variable breakdown in various countries:
Read more »

Here you can read an independent review of how Barclays lost its way and I submit to you that the fundamental problem was grammar:

In 2005, John Varley launched the Group’s five Guiding Principles – ‘customer focus’, ‘winning together’, ‘best people’, ‘pioneering’ and ‘trusted’ – demonstrating intent to oversee the Group through one set of values. (Section 8.14)

Are your five Guiding Principles nouns or adjectives?1 None can say. Even 30 Rock’s six sigmas were more grammatically consistent. If your five guiding principles are clearly just some mismatched words that someone wrote down and never edited, and that no one could actually use in a sentence, then: they’re not guiding anyone.2

And they didn’t. The lack of a shared understanding of values across Barclays spawned this chart, which might be my favorite thing ever:

Other than that though the report is kind of boring.3 Read more »

Whatever.

If you had John Stumpf in the office “highest-paid U.S. bank CEO for 2012″ pool, congratulations. Read more »

  • 16 Jan 2013 at 5:54 PM

Goldman Welcomed New CFO With A Nice Earnings Beat

If you read a lot of media coverage of Goldman Sachs earnings you get the sense that the most important number the firm reports is average compensation per employee, which this year was a nice oh-so-close-to-round $399,506. I CONCUR, of course.1 Also of interest is the comp ratio, which was only 39% this year, as less of the spoils of Goldman’s labors go to the people in the building doing the labors, and more go to the people providing the capital. Progress!

The analysts on the earnings call were not all that focused on comp, which I attribute to jealousy, but there were some exceptions. Like JPMorgan’s Kian Abouhossein, who pressed the Viniar/Schwartz CFO tag-team about expenses and headcount in Investing & Lending, playing an enjoyable guessing game with the twin CFOs about staffing levels in Investing & Lending:2

I mean, there are only few hundred — I assume there are only a few hundred people running in this division. I can’t believe there’s thousands of — I would be even surprised if it’s 1,000 people. So I’m just wondering why you’re having $2 billion to $3 billion of expenses. Is it interest expenses or is it something else? I just don’t understand why there’s such a big expense level.

Because the few hundred people are paid really well? Other? Dunno. You can guess why Schwiniar might have stalled here (and on a later question about I&L Basel III RWAs); the Investing & Lending business model has gotten some negative attention recently. The problem is basically that it does things like investing and lending, which almost violate the Volcker Rule, or would if it existed, which it doesn’t, yet.

Here is the FT’s Tracy Alloway on Goldman’s earnings: Read more »

  • 15 Jan 2013 at 2:48 PM
  • Banks

Goldman Exits A Tax Trade Early

Here is an important cultural difference between the US and the UK that you should, like, stick in the boot of your lorry or whatever: in the UK, it’s apparently not socially acceptable to put off paying bonuses by two months to save your employees five percentage points in taxes. In America, it’s considered perfectly reasonable to die to avoid a tax increase.1

I was not aware of this difference and it seems neither was Goldman Sachs:

Goldman Sachs has backed down from a plan to delay UK bonus payments until after the new UK tax year, which would have allowed bankers to benefit from a cut in the top rate of tax from 50 to 45 per cent. … The idea – first reported by the Financial Times on Sunday – would have seen the payment of the deferred portion of bonuses from prior years delayed from February until after April 6.

News of the plan prompted a flurry of criticism from lawmakers and even from within the banking industry.

Addressing the House of Commons Treasury select committee earlier on Tuesday, Sir Mervyn King, governor of the Bank of England, had criticised the idea.

“I find it a bit depressing that people who earn so much find it would be even more exciting to adjust their payouts to benefit from the tax rate, knowing that this must have an impact on the rest of society, which is suffering most from the consequences of the financial crisis,” Sir Mervyn told MPs. “I think it would be rather clumsy and lacking in care and attention to how other people might react. And in the long run, financial institutions do depend on goodwill from society,” he added.

You can sympathize with Goldman’s misunderstanding here, no? Read more »

  • 07 Jan 2013 at 1:53 PM

Paul Taubman’s Gardening Bill: $1.7 Million

Not that he needs the work, but ousted almost-former Morgan Stanley dealmaker Paul Taubman will be available on May 5. Read more »

  • 13 Dec 2012 at 5:43 PM

This Is America, Last Time Jamie Dimon Checked

Jamie Dimon, the CEO of the country’s largest bank by assets, says that regulating Wall Street pay could put us on the road to communism. “We all want an equitable society. We need to have a conversation about what makes it equitable,” the JPMorgan Chase CEO said at The New York Times DealBook conference on Wednesday. “You can go do it the way that Cuba tried. Okay, well, then it will be equitable, but everyone won’t have much.” “If you don’t want a free society, then start dictating what compensation can be,” he added. [HuffPo via Counterparties]