Credit Suisse

  • 13 Jan 2014 at 4:31 PM

Bonus Watch ’14: Everyone

Pay predictions for Credit Suisse, Deutsche Bank, Goldman Sachs, JP Morgan, RBS, UBS. Read more »

As a general rule, most people working on Wall Street (and working anywhere, really) try to avoid spending time with the HR professionals in their office. When face-time is required, it is usually because a) you need to watch an instructional video* on what is considered appropriate workplace behavior, and what is considered sexual harassment, as there have been complaints or b) you’re getting fired. Just the sight of an HR staffer on one’s floor will send shivers down the spine, which is why locking eyes with these people is to be avoided at all costs; god help the person who is asked to come have chat “in the conference room.”

An exception to the rule of maintaining a safe distance between oneself and anyone hailing from HR is probably Credit Suisse’s Michael Tshiyoyo, with whom a midday meeting will go something like this: Read more »

  • 21 Nov 2013 at 3:03 PM
  • Banks

It’s Called ‘Credit Suisse‘ For A Reason

The Swiss are looking out for number one, with a fence or a wall or a beaded curtain or something. Read more »

  • 24 Sep 2013 at 1:28 PM

Layoffs Watch ’13: Credit Suisse

The House of Dougan has had to say good-bye to a few of its own. Read more »

  • 16 May 2013 at 4:01 PM

Layoffs Watch ’13: Credit Suisse (Update)

Cuts are a’ coming at the House Of Dougan. Read more »

We don’t have her side of the story yet but from what her enemies say about her I like Agostina Pechi’s style. Pechi is the former Credit Suisse emerging markets sales VP who quit to go to Goldman and whom CS is now suing because she (allegedly) took a bunch of secret stuff with her when she left. Also because she (allegedly) did this:

[B]eginning in February 2013, Pechi represented to her manager as well as other senior group management that [a certain] client’s interest in this and other private transactions was flagging. Credit Suisse scheduled in-person meetings with the client in an effort to revive interest in the deals.

Pechi was deliberately evasive with management regarding the status of those meetings and whether high-level decision-makers on behalf of the client would attend. Based upon Pechi’s representations, senior Credit Suisse employees did not meet with the client.

However, as Credit Suisse later discovered, Pechi attended two meetings with representatives of the client, at least one of which was attended by high-level decision-makers on behalf of the client, as part of the above-referenced private transactions.

Upon information and belief, Pechi held these in-person meetings in an effort to shore up her relationship with the client in preparation for her departure and to explicitly discuss moving its business to Pechi’s new firm.

Except for those last two paragraphs, that sounds like something I would do!1 Speaking of misplaced diligence here’s how Pechi spent her last vacation at CS: Read more »

Time was, you could count on Swiss banks to assist their clients in the business of not paying taxes, having practically written the book on how to go about keeping one’s assets a secret from prying eyes (Chapter 1: Discarded toothpaste containers make a great place to stash diamonds). Now? Not only are they no longer providing the service, they’re suddenly too good to associate with people whose hands aren’t clean. Read more »