David Einhorn

So I guess the Einhorn effect hasn’t yet taken London by storm? There’s this:

David Einhorn’s $7.7 billion hedge fund Greenlight Capital Inc. disclosed a short position of 4.4 percent in the shares of Daily Mail and General Trust Plc, which publishes the U.K.’s second-biggest selling daily newspaper.

Greenlight’s bearish bet on London-based Daily Mail and General Trust, disclosed today on the website of the U.K.’s Financial Services Authority, was the biggest short position revealed by any hedge fund against a U.K. company under rules that took effect last week.

And yet there’s also this:

What are you doing, England? Don’t you know that when David Einhorn is short a stock, that stock goes down? There are rules here you know; today’s mild drop is not enough to comply. Read more »

In other GL third quarter updates, sources at Brovada say the investment team has swung from two point underdogs to 13.5 point favorites in the annual interoffice basketball game and the Greenlight baby-making machine continues to around the clock. Read more »

During a presentation on Tuesday at which he was expected to reveal his latest bearish thesis, Mr. Einhorn, a hedge fund manager, introduced a discussion of General Motors with an ambiguous line. Mr. Einhorn, the president of Greenlight Capital, pivoted on the ticker symbol of Green Mountain Coffee Roasters, a target of his criticism last year. “If you take the CR away from GMCR, you get G.M.,” Mr. Einhorn said. Shares of General Motors plunged, before investors realized that the assessment of the automaker was positive. Mr. Einhorn emphasized the folly of taking his ideas on faith. “It doesn’t make sense to blindly follow me or anyone else into a stock,” he said as a preface to his presentation at the Value Investing Congress in Manhattan. “Do your own work. And when a successful investor shows you their work, check their work.” [Dealbook]

Dear Greenlight Investors

August performance. Read more »

A world away from Wall Street and the tech money culture of Silicon Valley, the Einhorn family started a venture capital firm here [in Milwaukee], which raised a $40 million fund last year. David Einhorn is the largest investor in the fund, run by his brother, Daniel, and their father, Stephen. The firm, Capital Midwest Fund, also led by another partner, Alvin Vitangcol, aims to tap the Midwestern work ethic and has ambitions of changing the way early stage investments are run. “This isn’t Silicon Valley, where you’re almost encouraged to fail a couple times, and your next opportunity is in walking distance,” said Daniel Einhorn, who is 40… if a company financed by the new fund doesn’t provide the investors an exit within five years — through an acquisition — then Capital Midwest requires the company to buy back its shares. Daniel Einhorn doesn’t hesitate to put executives on the spot. Last month, surrounded by Brewers memorabilia in his office, he questioned the chief executive of one of his portfolio companies. It was a start-up based in Ann Arbor, Mich., called CytoPherx, and the firm was discussing clinical trials of a medical device that were not going smoothly. At one point, with the receiver on mute, Mr. Einhorn said the chief executive was making a “poor me” excuse. [Dealbook]

By early June the market had given back all of its first quarter gains, and the crisis yet again came to a head. The European leaders took a cue from Groundhog Day and did as they always do: they announced yet another ‘Summit to Fix Everything’…The whole thing is such a mess – who can blame them for heading for vacation? Besides, this allows the politicians to position themselves to give the appearance of personal sacrifice, should they need to interrupt their Olympics cheering to make emergency phone calls…Landon Lee, our Research Associate in Dallas, has decided to pursue an MBA at Columbia Business School. As Cheryl Einhorn is an Adjunct Professor there, one can’t help but feel that Landon is choosing Cheryl over David. And who wouldn’t? To discourage further poaching, David has taped a “Do Not Solicit Greenlight Employees” notice to the home fridge. [Greenlight 2012Q2 Letter To Investors]

Back in February, in his annual letter to investors, Berkshire Hathaway chief Warren Buffett spent a good bit of time discussing why one shouldn’t own gold. Beyond the fact that, according to WB, gold doesn’t “change in size and [is] incapable of producing anything,” and you’d be much better off buying farmland (which “a century from now will have produced staggering amounts of corn, wheat, cotton and other crops and will continue to produce that valuable bounty”) or shares of Exxon Mobil (which “will probably have delivered trillions of dollars in dividends to its owners”), the Oracle of Omaha had one incontrovertible, be all end all reason for eschewing the metal: its unfuckability. Oh sure, you can do things to a cube, you can fondle it, you can talk dirty to it, you can send nude pictures of yourself, you can even drill a hole in it and fuck it senseless, but, the thing is, the cube will not respond. No reciprocation, no gratitude, not even a sign it enjoyed itself.  For Buffett, no further argument was necessary as to the worthlessness of the commodity. (Silver, on the other hand, will make you feel like you’re 18 again.) Anyway, David Einhorn sort of feels the same way about the dollar. Read more »