Deutsche Bank

  • 16 Apr 2014 at 9:58 AM

Who Wants To Buy A Las Vegas Resort?

As some of you may recall, Deutsche Bank owns a casino1 (and hotel) in Las Vegas called The Cosmopolitan. If it seems out of character2 for the Germans to be proprietors of an establishment whose motto is “Just the right amount of wrong,” where people lay scantily clad around a pool by day and gorge themselves on food and drink before vomiting while waiting in line to get into a club by night, that’s because Deutsche only meant to get into the business of funding the project, not running it. Unfortunately, in 2008 the original developer, Ian Bruce Eichner, had to go and default on his loans, and when it became apparent that no one else wanted to invest in the place, the bank decided to just finish the thing itself, spending an addition $3 billion that went towards things like “a three-story crystal-strewn bar meant to evoke the inside of a chandelier.” Anyway, the resort has been been making slightly more money than in earlier years (while still “post[ing] net losses of around $100 million every year since opening”) and management has decided that as much fun as its been owning an in-house nightclub called “Rose. Rabbit. Lie.”, it’s time to sell. Read more »

Kai Lew was allegedly a little too open with the Monetary Authority of Singapore. Read more »

Deutsche Bank AG was ordered to give four traders fired in a rate-rigging investigation their exact jobs back while a court is hearing an appeals bid by the lender over the issue. The lender must pay a penalty equal to the men’s monthly salary unless it reinstates them in their original positions, Frankfurt Labor Appeals Court spokesman Wolfram Henkel said in an interview today…The Frankfurt Labor Court ruled last year the terminations were illegal and the bank must reinstate the employees, who made submissions for Euribor and Swiss Franc Libor. The court found “indications” that the fired staff wrongfully took derivatives trading positions into account when deciding what rates to submit. While it’s against bank rules to fix rates, the lender couldn’t use this as a reason to fire them because it didn’t have sufficient guidelines on rate submissions, didn’t control the process, and had systems in place that fostered the behavior, the court wrote in the judgment. [Bloomberg]

When prosecutors make a bee-line for your place after an uninvited visit to your lawyers, that’s probably not a good thing. Read more »

  • 20 Mar 2014 at 4:08 PM

Layoffs Watch ’14: Deutsche Bank

Zee Germans are mulling over cutting their own, at all levels. Read more »

Deutsche Bank reduced salaries and bonuses at the investment bank, which also includes sales and trading, by 14 percent to 5.34 billion euros last year from 6.24 billion euros in 2012, the company said. The compensation fell 23 percent in the fourth quarter from a year earlier. “We are keeping an eye on the competition and the pack that we’re competing with for talent,” Jain said. “What we are doing is something the whole industry is doing at varying speeds.” The bank hasn’t lost a “material” number of investment bankers after overhauling its compensation system, which includes staggering annual bonuses over a longer period, he said. [Bloomberg]

Deutsche Bank has concluded co-Chief Executive Anshu Jain is clean after an internal investigation into the role of the bank into the manipulation of global interest rates, German newspaper Frankfurter Allgemeine Sonntagszeitung reported. Citing supervisory board sources, the paper reported that the internal probe had cleared Jain of involvement in the Libor scandal after scrutinizing bank documents and interviewing hundreds of Deutsche Bank employees. [Reuters]