Deutsche Bank

  • 30 Oct 2014 at 4:30 PM
  • Banks

Deutsche Bank, Suspended Traders Are Friends Again

Alright, you can come down now.When a German judge tells you in clipped tones that you do not want her weighing in on the matter of (a) your suspension for (allegedly!) trying to manipulate interest rates or (b) your suspending said alleged manipulators without actually following any of the (probably thousands of) rules in Germany regarding such, you listen. Deutsche Bank and its suspended traders have listened. Read more »

deutsche-bankDeutsche Bank AG , which has struggled to overcome investor concerns about its financial strength, is replacing its longtime finance chief with a Goldman Sachs Group Inc. partner, according to people familiar with the matter. Stefan Krause , who has faced criticism from investors over his financial leadership of the giant German bank, will take a newly created position within Deutsche Bank, with responsibilities including strategy, cost-cutting and other issues, the people said. His replacement, Marcus Schenck, was the finance chief of German utility E.ON AG from 2006 through 2013. He joined Goldman Sachs last year. [WSJ]

Colin Fan, he of the “I have lost my patience” with you pricks video address, explains: Read more »

You get nichts! Read more »

The world’s biggest banks are overhauling how they trade currencies to regain the trust of customers and preempt regulators’ efforts to force changes on an industry tarnished by allegations of manipulation. Barclays Plc, Deutsche Bank AG, Goldman Sachs Group Inc., Royal Bank of Scotland Group Plc and UBS AG, which together account for 43 percent of foreign-exchange trading by banks, are introducing measures to make it harder for dealers to profit from confidential customer information and take advantage of clients in the largely unregulated $5.3 trillion-a-day currency market, according to people with knowledge of the changes. Banks have capped what employees can charge for exchanging currencies, limited dealers’ access to information about customer orders, banned the use of online chat rooms and pushed trades onto electronic platforms, according to the people, who asked not to be identified because they weren’t authorized to discuss their firms’ practices. [Bloomberg]

  • 04 Sep 2014 at 11:55 AM
  • Banks

It Won’t Be 2007 Again Until 2024 (And Not Really Even Then)

Deutsche Bank has gone back and re-crunched some numbers and found a couple of things about the line of business it is in. For one, it may have, well, let’s say misspoke when it suggested in December that the Goldmans of the world would inherit the banking industry. Seems that may have been at best a touch optimistic and at worst completely wrong. The Germans have also found that investment banking may not be an industry that one wants to inherit at all. Read more »

  • 12 Aug 2014 at 3:15 PM

Vascular Biogenics Will Show Itself Out

Forget about what you thought you heard about an IPO. There was no IPO. Read more »