Deutsche Bank

Deutsche Bank AG was ordered to give four traders fired in a rate-rigging investigation their exact jobs back while a court is hearing an appeals bid by the lender over the issue. The lender must pay a penalty equal to the men’s monthly salary unless it reinstates them in their original positions, Frankfurt Labor Appeals Court spokesman Wolfram Henkel said in an interview today…The Frankfurt Labor Court ruled last year the terminations were illegal and the bank must reinstate the employees, who made submissions for Euribor and Swiss Franc Libor. The court found “indications” that the fired staff wrongfully took derivatives trading positions into account when deciding what rates to submit. While it’s against bank rules to fix rates, the lender couldn’t use this as a reason to fire them because it didn’t have sufficient guidelines on rate submissions, didn’t control the process, and had systems in place that fostered the behavior, the court wrote in the judgment. [Bloomberg]

A couple of notoriously lax securities regulators would like to see the adjective “notoriously lax” excised from before their names.

First, to Toronto, where the Ontario Securities Commission is looking longingly at Preet Bharara’s ability to command the entire FBI to stop what it’s doing to surreptitiously tape some mid-level hedge fund analyst’s phone calls. Read more »

When prosecutors make a bee-line for your place after an uninvited visit to your lawyers, that’s probably not a good thing. Read more »

Deutsche Bank reduced salaries and bonuses at the investment bank, which also includes sales and trading, by 14 percent to 5.34 billion euros last year from 6.24 billion euros in 2012, the company said. The compensation fell 23 percent in the fourth quarter from a year earlier. “We are keeping an eye on the competition and the pack that we’re competing with for talent,” Jain said. “What we are doing is something the whole industry is doing at varying speeds.” The bank hasn’t lost a “material” number of investment bankers after overhauling its compensation system, which includes staggering annual bonuses over a longer period, he said. [Bloomberg]

Deutsche Bank has concluded co-Chief Executive Anshu Jain is clean after an internal investigation into the role of the bank into the manipulation of global interest rates, German newspaper Frankfurter Allgemeine Sonntagszeitung reported. Citing supervisory board sources, the paper reported that the internal probe had cleared Jain of involvement in the Libor scandal after scrutinizing bank documents and interviewing hundreds of Deutsche Bank employees. [Reuters]

  • 13 Jan 2014 at 4:31 PM

Bonus Watch ’14: Everyone

Pay predictions for Credit Suisse, Deutsche Bank, Goldman Sachs, JP Morgan, RBS, UBS. Read more »

Deutsche Bank, Europe’s biggest investment bank by revenue, will review whether to punish senior employees including Alan Cloete for their roles in the interest-rate rigging scandal, according to a person with knowledge of the matter. Deutsche Bank’s supervisory board will discuss punishments early in the week of Jan. 27, said the person, who asked not to be named as the meeting isn’t public. These include firing or disciplining Cloete — who oversaw traders alleged to have sought to rig benchmark rates — and employees responsible for how the bank dealt with the scandal, the person said. The potential sanctions follow a Jan. 5 report in Der Spiegel that German banking regulator Bafin told Deutsche Bank in August that its management and supervisory boards didn’t adequately investigate and address the alleged rate-rigging. The German news magazine didn’t say where it got the information. [Bloomberg]