Deutsche Bank

Vulgarities and indiscreet chatter have percolated through Wall Street’s trading floors and online chat rooms for many years, and might have stayed there were it not for a string of recent regulatory crackdowns. Now, thanks to investigations that have produced reams of internal communications among traders and brokers, a window has opened onto the predominantly male locker room culture of finance. Some banks — anxious to avoid further embarrassments — are taking steps to clean up that culture. “Some of you are falling way short of our established standards,” Colin Fan, the co-chief of the investment banking division at Deutsche Bank, the big German lender, said in a recent internal video, outlining a code of conduct that has echoes of the famous etiquette guidelines published nearly a century ago by Mrs. Post. “Let’s be clear,” Mr. Fan continued. “Our reputation is everything. Being boastful, indiscreet and vulgar is not O.K. It will have serious consequences for your career, and I have lost patience on this issue.” [Dealbook]

Blackstone has agreed to buy the Cosmopolitan of Las Vegas, Deutsche Bank’s $4 billion dollar mistake. The private equity firm will pay $1.73 billion to acquire an establishment that Deutsche top executives have refused to be associated with; people go to not gamble; and in five years has never turned a profit. For those who think the deal represents a loss for DB, remember that they were just about ready to give the place away for free. Read more »

Deutsche Bank, as you all know, owns a Las Vegas resort and casino called the Cosmopolitan. The bank never set out to be the proprietors of such an establishment, but after a developer who they loaned money to defaulted, they didn’t have much choice, did they? So now, here we are, 6 years and $4 billion later. Senior execs at the bank won’t be seen there. Guests aren’t particularly interested in gambling at the place. And, by the way, it’s never turned a profit. So it wasn’t entirely surprising to hear the Germans had decided to try and find someone to take the investment off their hands and that was before this happened: Read more »

Kai Lew was allegedly a little too open with the Monetary Authority of Singapore. Read more »

Deutsche Bank AG was ordered to give four traders fired in a rate-rigging investigation their exact jobs back while a court is hearing an appeals bid by the lender over the issue. The lender must pay a penalty equal to the men’s monthly salary unless it reinstates them in their original positions, Frankfurt Labor Appeals Court spokesman Wolfram Henkel said in an interview today…The Frankfurt Labor Court ruled last year the terminations were illegal and the bank must reinstate the employees, who made submissions for Euribor and Swiss Franc Libor. The court found “indications” that the fired staff wrongfully took derivatives trading positions into account when deciding what rates to submit. While it’s against bank rules to fix rates, the lender couldn’t use this as a reason to fire them because it didn’t have sufficient guidelines on rate submissions, didn’t control the process, and had systems in place that fostered the behavior, the court wrote in the judgment. [Bloomberg]

A couple of notoriously lax securities regulators would like to see the adjective “notoriously lax” excised from before their names.

First, to Toronto, where the Ontario Securities Commission is looking longingly at Preet Bharara’s ability to command the entire FBI to stop what it’s doing to surreptitiously tape some mid-level hedge fund analyst’s phone calls. Read more »

When prosecutors make a bee-line for your place after an uninvited visit to your lawyers, that’s probably not a good thing. Read more »