Deutsche Bank

When prosecutors make a bee-line for your place after an uninvited visit to your lawyers, that’s probably not a good thing. Read more »

  • 20 Mar 2014 at 4:08 PM

Layoffs Watch ’14: Deutsche Bank

Zee Germans are mulling over cutting their own, at all levels. Read more »

Deutsche Bank reduced salaries and bonuses at the investment bank, which also includes sales and trading, by 14 percent to 5.34 billion euros last year from 6.24 billion euros in 2012, the company said. The compensation fell 23 percent in the fourth quarter from a year earlier. “We are keeping an eye on the competition and the pack that we’re competing with for talent,” Jain said. “What we are doing is something the whole industry is doing at varying speeds.” The bank hasn’t lost a “material” number of investment bankers after overhauling its compensation system, which includes staggering annual bonuses over a longer period, he said. [Bloomberg]

  • 13 Jan 2014 at 4:31 PM

Bonus Watch ’14: Everyone

Pay predictions for Credit Suisse, Deutsche Bank, Goldman Sachs, JP Morgan, RBS, UBS. Read more »

Deutsche Bank, Europe’s biggest investment bank by revenue, will review whether to punish senior employees including Alan Cloete for their roles in the interest-rate rigging scandal, according to a person with knowledge of the matter. Deutsche Bank’s supervisory board will discuss punishments early in the week of Jan. 27, said the person, who asked not to be named as the meeting isn’t public. These include firing or disciplining Cloete — who oversaw traders alleged to have sought to rig benchmark rates — and employees responsible for how the bank dealt with the scandal, the person said. The potential sanctions follow a Jan. 5 report in Der Spiegel that German banking regulator Bafin told Deutsche Bank in August that its management and supervisory boards didn’t adequately investigate and address the alleged rate-rigging. The German news magazine didn’t say where it got the information. [Bloomberg]

JP Morgan Chase and Deutsche Bank are extending bans on the use of multi-dealer online chatrooms, sources familiar with the plans told Reuters, as banks crack down on potentially inappropriate communications following a string of scandals. Chatrooms have been a focus for regulators investigating manipulation of benchmark interest rates and possible rigging in the $5.3 trillion-a-day foreign exchange (FX) market. A source familiar with developments at JP Morgan, the biggest U.S. bank by assets, said the decision was unrelated to the FX probes which surfaced in June, noting chatrooms had been under review at the bank since earlier this year. “This has always been about more than FX,” the source said, adding that the casual nature of online chatrooms increased the potential for “inappropriate” remarks to be made. [Reuters, Related: UBS Making Foreign Exchange Rate Manipulation Mildly More Inconvenient]

At the end of October, Deutsche Bank held a town hall on the topic of electronic communication, specifically the perils of making statements re: engaging in fraud, even in jest. To be safe, one should reserve such riffing for face-to-face conversations, or, to avoid headaches in the form of house calls from the FBI, insert some sort of disclaimer in the chat making clear that any talk of breaking the law is not to be taken seriously. Clearly, these are good tips that Deutsche employees will presumably employ moving forward. Unfortunately, they came a bit too late for trader Richard Whalen, who in retrospect would’ve appreciated hearing them before taking part in the “ill-advised” banter that led to this: Read more »