Deutsche Bank

As those of you outside of New York City can attest, in other parts of the world, people do not need to limit their grocery store purchases to the number of bags they can carry (if they prefer not to order food online, sight unseen), wait for the B for what feels like an eternity while F train after F train after F train passes through the station, stake their claim to an apartment the second they walk through the door if they want any shot of getting it,* fantasize about having an in-unit washer/dryer, or feel like they’re taking crazy pills while watching the featured couple on any give episode of House Hunters declare they are looking for “At least 4 bedrooms, a minimum of 2,000 square feet, big backyard, granite countertops, stainless steel appliances, double vanity in the master bath, finished basement, gotta have a finished basement” on a $185,000 dollar budget, a wish list that turns out to be totally doable.**

None of these are the reasons why Deutsche Bank is moving a whole bunch of bankers and traders to Jacksonville, Florida– those would be the immense cost savings, of course–, but they are some of the factors being cited as bright sides among the relocated. Read more »


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  • 13 Aug 2013 at 5:12 PM

Know Your CEOs: Anshu Jain

“[Deustche Bank chief Anshu] Jain is a hard-charging investment-banking veteran with a well documented interest in tigers.” [WSJ]

Bloomberg has an absolutely amazing story this morning about political economy and going the extra mile to build a successful business. Specifically it’s about a guy who

  • worked as a mortgage banker,
  • left to be a senior banking consumer-protection regulator,
  • wrote regulations prohibiting big banks from providing certain kinds of mortgages because they were too predatory, and
  • then left to start his own company to provide those mortgages.

That’s pretty much the American dream is it not?

The story is unimprovable so go read it; I have exaggerated but only slightly.1 The guy is Raj Date, a former Capital One and Deutsche Bank2 banker who became deputy director of the Consumer Financial Protection Board, wrote rules making it hard for banks to make mortgages that don’t satisfy certain bright-line requirements, and then left to start a company called Fenway Summer LLC that will do what banks can’t: Read more »

  • 11 Jul 2013 at 3:05 PM

Deutsche Bank Did Some Accounting Stuff

I used to work in a business that, among other things, helped clients get financing against securities. One thing that you learn quickly in that business, and then spend the rest of your career trying to forget, is that the simplest way to get financing against securities is to sell them. You’ve got $100 of stock and want to borrow $80 of cash against it? Just sell the stock, now you have $100, you’re welcome.1

This is not a perfect solution, of course, because you presumably owned the stock for a reason, and that reason was presumably that you thought it would go up.2 And if you sell it you lose the chance to participate in that upside. So one thing you could do is (1) sell your stock for $100 today and (2) enter into some sort of transaction that gives you some or all of the upside in the stock over some period of time. Like, you could buy a call option struck at $100, giving you all the upside and none of the downside, though at the cost of having to pay premium for the call option. Or you could enter into a total return swap struck at $100, giving you all of the upside and all of the downside at a zero-ish cost. Or you could enter into a forward contract to buy back the stock, which is the same as the swap, more or less. That last one – sell stock today, enter into a forward to buy it back in the future – is so common that it has a name, and the name is “repo.” Read more »

He actually made seven of them, to be exact, and while we can’t say for sure he regrets them all (some evidence suggests he might be the type of person who’d say dating a couple strippers simultaneously was “worth it”), it’s possible he regrets *some* and certainly regrets their cumulative impact. They include:

  • Getting involved with a jealous stripper.
  • Getting involved with another jealous stripper.
  • Introducing both strippers to his daughter in violation of a court order that barred him* from doing so.
  • Taking “compromising” photos with Stripper 1.
  • Letting Stripper 1 find out about Stripper 2.
  • Letting his ex-wife find out about both of them.
  • Not paying his legal bills.

Read more »

  • 23 May 2013 at 2:13 PM

Anshu Jain’s Rosetta Stone Tapes Are PAYING OFF

“Sehr geehrte Damen und Herren, liebe Aktionäre” [Ladies and gentlemen, dear shareholders]. “Herzlich willkommen zur Hauptversammlung der Deutschen Bank” [A warm welcome to Deutsche Bank's annual general meeting]. Deutsche Bank’s co-chief executive, Anshu Jain, Thursday awed shareholders by giving a two-page introductory speech at the bank’s annual shareholders meeting in…German. It was the moment some shareholders had been waiting for. At last year’s AGM, some German investors had voiced concern as to whether they would need to learn English in order to understand the newly elected co-chief executive of “their bank.” Mr Jain, an Indian-born with a British passport, took office almost a year ago after the shareholder’s meeting, along with co-chief executive Juergen Fitschen, a native German speaker. [WSJ]