Donald Sterling

He may not even be allowed to set foot in the Staples Center parking lot on game nights, but Donald Sterling is motivated by a much higher force: spite. Strong, powerful spite. Strong enough to contemptuously dismiss an offer nearly four times as high as any received by an NBA team in history. Strong enough to cling to the Clippers despite being banned from the league for the rest of his declining years. And strong enough to force his family trust into default and a probable fire-sale of real estate just to deny Shelly Sterling the satisfaction of making him $1 billion richer. Read more »

Donald Sterling told a judge his fight to block the $2 billion sale of the Los Angeles Clippers to former Microsoft Corp. Chief Executive Officer Steve Ballmer is about economics, not ego. “You think I’m doing this for ego?” Sterling asked a lawyer for his wife, Shelly Sterling, during one of many testy exchanges on the second day of a trial to determine whether she had sole authority to sell the National Basketball Association team after having her husband declared incapacitated. Sterling, 80, said he was negotiating a new cable-television contract with 21st Century Fox Inc. and that television providers’ demand for content would continue to drive up the value of sports franchises. The Clippers’ success on the court this year also has created interest from several radio stations to carry the games, he testified. “My wife can’t run anything,” Sterling told a state probate judge in Los Angeles who is deciding the case without a jury. “Of course I believe the team is worth more.” [Bloomberg]

Los Angeles Clippers owner Donald Sterling has a right to pursue his $1 billion federal lawsuit against the National Basketball Association, but the 80-year-old might not live to see the end result, millionaire businessman Kevin O’Leary told CNBC on Tuesday. “This will not be resolved until Mr. Sterling is dead because this is going to last three to seven years … I don’t think he’s going to outlast the litigation. It’ll get settled after he’s passed,” said O’Leary. [CNBC]