fines

Steven A. Cohen proved to be a stickler for the letter of the law when it came to paying the criminal penalty imposed on his former hedge fund as part of its guilty plea on insider trading charges. On April 10, Judge Laura Taylor Swain of Federal District Court in Manhattan gave Mr. Cohen’s SAC Capital Advisors up to 90 days to pay the $848 million penalty, part of an overall $1.2 billion criminal settlement reached with prosecutors last November. On Tuesday, the 90th day since Judge Swain accepted the firm’s guilty plea, Mr. Cohen’s firm made that payment, according to court records. [Dealbook]

  • 17 Jun 2014 at 3:23 PM

Civil Penalty Watch ’14: Rajat Gupta

Ex-Goldman Sachs board member Rajat Gupta reported to prison earlier today for, among other things, being unable to wait more than 23 seconds to spill material non-public information to now-known insider trader Raj Rajaratnam. Also, he needs to come up with about $24.9 million, if anyone’s feeling generous. Read more »

On Monday, Paradigm Capital Management became the first investment fund to pay a fine for retaliating against an employee who reported his firm’s misdeeds to the S.E.C. The hedge fund, which is based in Albany, N.Y., and manages $1.5 billion of client money, agreed to pay $2.2 million to settle the civil charges…Mr. Nordgaard was head trader at Paradigm Capital from 2009 to August 2012, when his contract was terminated. Mr. Nordgaard, who filed a lawsuit against the firm in 2012, said that shortly after he told his employer that he had reported trading violations, Paradigm Capital “embarked on a campaign of retaliation” against him. Days later, Mr. Nordgaard was removed from his desk and stripped of his trading privileges, according to the lawsuit. He was then assigned to “an isolated location to do low-level compliance work”. [Dealbook]

Complete with the fake static. Read more »

Late last month, Credit Suisse pleaded guilty to helping many of its clients hide their assets from the IRS, and paid the U.S. $2.6 billion to demonstrate just how sorry it was for doing so. And though some thought that clients and counterparties would subsequently look at the bank in a different and negative light, it turned out that no one cared at all. BNP Paribas, however, is not so lucky.

Although the number has yet to be finalized, and the president of France is doing his part to pull some strings to get it down, it’s highly possible that the French bank will be forced to pay upwards of $10 billion for “transferring funds for clients in violation of [U.S.] sanctions against countries including Sudan and Iran.” And while $2.6 billion is but pocket change, when you get past, say, $7 billion, and certainly up to $10 billion, you start to talk about real money. Naturally, this has BNP clients nervous about what all this means for business, and the upper echelons of BNP management nervous about how their employees might respond to questions without the benefit of a script (“I’m glad you asked, Jaques…1“). So… Read more »

As may have heard, BNP Paribas is probably going to write a check for something in the range of $8 billion to $10 billion in order to settle allegations that it violated U.S. sanctions against Iran, Sudan, and a few other places. And while a couple billion or so to make allegations of wrongdoing go away would be but pocket change (and has historically been regarded as no big deal to banks forking over that amount to, say, stop being the poster child for massive tax fraud), senior executives at BNP are actually starting to think 8 or so billion dollars is kind of a lot of money. Read more »

The U.S. Justice Department is pushing BNP Paribas to pay more than $10 billion to resolve a criminal probe into allegations it evaded U.S. sanctions against Iran and other countries for years, which would represent one of the largest penalties ever imposed on a bank, according to people familiar with the negotiations…BNP is looking to pay less than $8 billion, according to the people familiar with the settlement discussions, although a person close to the bank said its negotiators haven’t mentioned the $8 billion figure in talks with U.S. authorities. [WSJ]