fines

toysrusThe investment banks promised favorable research to Toys “R” Us Inc. and its private-equity owners to win roles in its initial public offering, the Financial Industry Regulatory Authority said today in a statement. The regulator fined the firms a total of $43.5 million, faulting them for “implicitly or explicitly” making promises that their analysts would give positive coverage. Six of the 10 firms didn’t have adequate supervisory procedures to prevent the practice…In May 2010, Citigroup’s investment bankers hosted a chaperoned call with the firm’s research analyst, who then e-mailed a supervisor. “I so want the bank to get this deal!” the analyst said in the e-mail, according to Finra. Days later, bankers told the retailer that they could “count on Citi’s firm-wide support and advocacy for the Toys story and valuation.” Other firms contacted Toys “R” Us after making their pitches, expressing enthusiasm about the firm’s prospects and providing assurances that the views of bankers and analysts were aligned, Finra said. Toys “R” Us and investors, including KKR & Co., withdrew the IPO filing last year. [Bloomberg]

brianmoynihanbofa2It’s a great day in Moynihan Land. Read more »

Made of solid platinum.When building cases against financial wrongdoers of all shapes and sizes, prosecutors and their junior partners over at the SEC have a couple of options. Find some people willing to spill on other people in exchange for not being put in jail, or pay them. The latter is accomplished via the whistleblower program, which can net you a pretty nice lump sum, indeed. Now, having to share obviously cuts into Mary Jo White and Preet Bharara’s haul, and someone’s going to have to pay for that. Guess who? Read more »

rbsIf you’re going to team up with other banks to manipulate interest rates and engage in other shady behavior, just make sure to be the first one to go to regulators and let them know what you’ve all been up to. Read more »

Britain and the US tag-teamed a 1-2 punch around breakfast and lunch, respectively so who wants to knee the bank in the balls on its way home from work tonight or just after dinner? France? Germany? Read more »

Over the last several years, Bank of America has paid something like $827 billion in fines and settlements, including $16.65 billion just last month. So while another billion here or there would represent but a drop in the bucket, you can sort of understand why Moynihan et al would be done, emotionally, cutting these checks and why they would try and get out of whatever penalties they can, however thin the arguments for doing so (“Just put us out of our misery already”) may be. Unfortunately, today is apparently not Moynihan’s day and tomorrow’s not looking very good either. Read more »

Steven A. Cohen proved to be a stickler for the letter of the law when it came to paying the criminal penalty imposed on his former hedge fund as part of its guilty plea on insider trading charges. On April 10, Judge Laura Taylor Swain of Federal District Court in Manhattan gave Mr. Cohen’s SAC Capital Advisors up to 90 days to pay the $848 million penalty, part of an overall $1.2 billion criminal settlement reached with prosecutors last November. On Tuesday, the 90th day since Judge Swain accepted the firm’s guilty plea, Mr. Cohen’s firm made that payment, according to court records. [Dealbook]

  • 17 Jun 2014 at 3:23 PM

Civil Penalty Watch ’14: Rajat Gupta

Ex-Goldman Sachs board member Rajat Gupta reported to prison earlier today for, among other things, being unable to wait more than 23 seconds to spill material non-public information to now-known insider trader Raj Rajaratnam. Also, he needs to come up with about $24.9 million, if anyone’s feeling generous. Read more »