Goldman Sachs alums

Remember Deeb Salem? Goldman Sachs alum who worked at the firm as a mortgage trader for a number of years, despite numerous attempts by rivals to poach him and his self-described Michael Jordan-esque skills? Thought he was going to get paid $13 million in 2010 and told his mom to expect as much, only to be informed the number was more like $8.25 million? Sued the bank for the extra $5 million, demanding it make good on the promise he’d made to woman who’d give him life? He recently got some not great news. Read more »

  • 10 Jul 2014 at 5:44 PM

Greg Smith-Lite Wants To Lend You Some Money

Steven Mandis knows what we’re talking about. Read more »

Former Goldman Sachs trader Deeb Salem was awarded $8.25 million in 2010. He wanted $13 million and continues to fight for the extra 5 mill four years later because 1) While at Goldman, he was the Michael Jordan of investment professionals in the mortgage industry and had to fend off highly appealing offers from other firms on a near daily basis and 2) He had told his mother to expect 13. Read more »

Former Goldman Sachs employee Fabrice Tourre hasn’t had a great year. In August, a federal jury found him “liable on six of seven claims that he violated federal securities law by intentionally misleading investors,” in addition to “aiding and abetting an alleged fraud by Goldman.” In March, a judge ordered to pay $825,000 ($175,463 in gains related to the deal that investors were misled on, $650,000 in civil penalties). That same month, the University of Chicago, the place that Fab fled to after leaving Goldman Sachs to rebuild his life as an academic, decided it didn’t want him teaching it undergrads. So, things have been tough. But while he may not have the support of his ex-employer, the securities industry, Judge Katherine Forrest, or 100% of Chicago’s economics department faculty,1 he does have this: Read more »

On Tuesday, Rajat K. Gupta, the former managing director of the consulting firm McKinsey & Company who was convicted of insider trading, is scheduled to report to a minimum-security prison camp in Massachusetts, spending the next two years not far from his one-time friend and partner in crime, Raj Rajaratnam…In an interesting twist, Mr. Rajaratnam, the man to whom Mr. Gupta was convicted of giving corporate secrets on a raft of companies, including Goldman Sachs, is in FMC Devens’ federal medical center. Mr. Rajaratnam, the founder of New York hedge fund Galleon Group, is a diabetic and FMC Devens’ medical unit provides dialysis. His facility is next to the satellite camp where Mr. Gupta will be. One of the differences between the two prisons is that Mr. Rajaratnam has slightly longer visiting hours. On Fridays, he can mix with friends and family from 8:30 a.m. to 3 pm; Mr. Gupta can receive guests only from 2:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. [Dealbook]

“I always have visions and dreams of things you can do, and this is a realization of something,” Dweck, 58, said near his violin-shaped pool, where about 5,600 fiber-optic cables light up like multicolored strings. “The idea is to improve quality of life using technology.” The company he registered last month, Live Better Systems LLC, will have competition from Wall Street veterans working to make the good life better…The renovation of his stone-and-shingle house — whose reverse-osmosis filtration makes his shower water “like bottled water” even if it lacks the Delos vitamins — will cost $3 million, he said. He estimates he’ll spend an additional $3 million fixing up grounds that include the pool, a baseball field, an outdoor kitchen and a movie screen. “Lots of people have that money,” he said. “They’re willing to spend it on, to me, much more frivolous things.” [Bloomberg, earlier]

Rajat Gupta, the Goldman Sachs director who waited but 23 seconds after a Goldman board meeting to call hedge fund manager Raj Rajaratnam with material, non-public information, has lost his bid to stay out of jail. Read more »