Goldman Sachs

Lloyd Blankfein Gary CohnGoldman commissioned its own study re: certain allegations of gender discrimination and the results show there’s a lot that went over Cristina Chen-Oster and Shanna Orlich’s heads. Read more »

Goldman Sachs Just Wants A Winner

Assessing the cost of the place.Lloyd Blankfein may have a direct line to the Big Guy Upstairs, but he seems to have been withholding some crucial information in recent years, based on certain bets made by GS. That Romney character is not President of the United States, Goldman’s best check-writing efforts notwithstanding, and Brazil is rather emphatically not sporting a sixth star on their soccer jerseys these days. But if the polls are right—and, really, when are they not?—Goldman won’t be backing the wrong horse this time around. Read more »

Bonus Watch ’14: Goldman Sachs

Thanks, guys.The Little Lloyds won’t be getting as much of that extra 25% in revenue the bank earned last quarter, but they’ll do alright. Read more »

  • 16 Sep 2014 at 2:16 PM
  • Banks

Goldman Sachs: Teacher’s Pet

Wall Street’s banks were pretty hard on themselves for this year’s choose-your-own-misadventure stress-test trial runs, conjuring a way worse recession than they did last year, and doing concomitantly worse as a result. Citigroup’s Tier 1 would fall from 9.1% to 8.7%, JPMorgan’s from 8.5% to 8.4%, Morgan Stanley’s from 9.5% to 8.9% and Wells Fargo’s from 9.9% to 9.6%.

But not everyone’s doing so badly, even when they were really, really hard on themselves. Read more »

The world’s biggest banks are overhauling how they trade currencies to regain the trust of customers and preempt regulators’ efforts to force changes on an industry tarnished by allegations of manipulation. Barclays Plc, Deutsche Bank AG, Goldman Sachs Group Inc., Royal Bank of Scotland Group Plc and UBS AG, which together account for 43 percent of foreign-exchange trading by banks, are introducing measures to make it harder for dealers to profit from confidential customer information and take advantage of clients in the largely unregulated $5.3 trillion-a-day currency market, according to people with knowledge of the changes. Banks have capped what employees can charge for exchanging currencies, limited dealers’ access to information about customer orders, banned the use of online chat rooms and pushed trades onto electronic platforms, according to the people, who asked not to be identified because they weren’t authorized to discuss their firms’ practices. [Bloomberg]

Happy Days At 200 West Street

The news is all good, indeed, for Lloyd and Co. so far this week. Goldman has once again demonstrated its dominance amongst its “peers,” being named the “stabilization agent” for a $20 billion-plus IPO. Read more »

Goldman Tells Potential Partners Not To Get Their Hopes Up

Once again, there will be fewer partners and potentially more David Teppers at Goldman later this year: The Elect plan to add no more than 70 to their number in the bi-annual life-changing ritual, unless an extra few really, really impress Michael Sherwood over the next couple of months. For new partners not only crowd the inner circle—they also cost a great deal. And if the 409 already at the pinnacle are going to continue to rake it in exercising stock options, those costs need to be kept down. Read more »