great work everyone

So how can hedge funds have more than half their money in stocks and still return, at best, about one-tenth the S&P500? It’s simple, really: Read more »

  • 14 Mar 2014 at 4:11 PM

UBS Tried, And Failed, To Rig Hong Kong Interest Rate

…which elicited an utterly delightful response from the bank that sounds a lot like something the parents of a juvenile delinquent would say if it came out that their kid tried to burn down a building but was too high to light the match. Read more »

  • 16 Oct 2013 at 5:37 PM

Shutdown Watch, Day 16: On Hiatus Until January?

They fought the good fight and got routed. Now, the losers will now pass a deal that is “far less than many of us hoped for,” one they could have passed three weeks (or months) ago, avoided the whole mess and still got precisely the same thing: nothing. Read more »

Oil traders razor-focused on signs of escalating violence in the Middle East were jolted on Thursday by a Twitter posting from the Israeli military that, at first glance, suggested they had just bombed Syrian airports. Oil prices jumped $1 as the talk raced through oil markets, which frequently react quickly to rumors of geopolitical events and where traders have increasingly turned to the Internet and social media for advance warning of escalating risks, from the Arab Spring to the Iranian nuclear standoff. The Tweet was true, but it wasn’t news. The posting referred to an attack 40 years ago in the Yom Kippur war, the latest in a series of Tweets from the Israel Defense Forces Twitter handle (@IDFSpokesperson) commemorating the war. The Tweet just before 10:30 a.m. EDT stated: “October 10 #YomKippur73: Israel Air Force bombards airports in Syria to prevent Soviet weapons reaching the Syrian Army”. It then links to a website that gives a day-by-day account of the war. “Obviously this was part of our Yom Kippur Twitter series. The facts are there and simple to read. It was apparent within the Tweet itself,” said IDF spokesman Peter Lerner. [Reuters]

  • 22 Aug 2013 at 1:17 PM

Call The (Nasdaq) (Re)open (UPDATE)

Update: And the winner is “Somewhere in DFW” with the closest time without going over (before an announcement was made with the actual time), 2:57PM. SIDFW, get in touch to collect your winnings! Read more »

The historic Lehman Brothers bankruptcy has hit another milestone: $2 billion in fees paid to professionals. In a Thursday filing with U.S. Bankruptcy Court in Manhattan, Lehman said it has spent $160.8 million in fees since exiting from bankruptcy in March. Added to the $1.9 billion it incurred during its 42 months in bankruptcy, the failed investment bank has eclipsed $2 billion in fees paid. That’s the most in the nation’s history. Lehman previously stated that it incurred less than $1.8 billion in fees before leaving Chapter 11 protection in March but disclosed in the Thursday filing that the number increased by $132 million in recent months for several reasons, including the payment of incentive fees to professionals as well as approvals of older applications. [WSJ]

UBS’s $1.5 billion settlement for manipulating interbank lending rates is the fourth separate regulatory finding against the Swiss group in as many years – underlining the failure of bank executives to reform the corporate culture…Just last month, a London jury convicted one of UBS’s former traders, Kweku Adoboli, of the biggest banking fraud in British history after he lost $2.3 billion in rogue trades. The FSA also fined the bank 29.7 million pounds ($39.2 million) for allowing the unauthorized trades. The trading loss is now seen among UBS staff as the new benchmark of wrongdoing, with reports of relief among employees that the bank’s $1.5 billion global Libor settlement was “only half an Adoboli.” [FT]