Greenwich

  • 14 Mar 2014 at 1:51 PM

Sleep Where Sandy Weill’s Son Hath Slept

The former Citigroup chairman bought the property next to his house in Greenwich hoping it’d become “a family compound,” and while his son Marc built a house on it and lived there for four years, in 2008 he sold it back to dad and split for NYC. So! What do you get for $14 million asking price? 16,460 square feet, views of Long Island Sound, a home theater, and a koi pond, yes, but also, and much more importantly: the opportunity to have Sandy Weill knock on your door and ask to borrow a cup of sugar, as he’ll be your neighbor. And according to Papa Weill, the house on the market practically dwarfs his own, which is something of a hovel in comparison. Read more »

With an indoor lacrosse field that could be yours. Read more »

Time was, you needed a bag filled with at least $10 million in unmarked twenties to buy a house in Greenwich, CT, where many a multi-billionaire hedge fund manager reside, and it’s a legitimate insult to have a newspaper claim your home is a measly 14,000 square feet. Now? Thanks to the global financial crisis, job cuts, and bonuses that leave people sobbing under their desks? Sellers no longer have the luxury of standing their ground and waiting for someone to come along who appreciates their Bloomberg Terminal-shaped pool and the $50 million price tag that comes with, allowing practically anyone to buy in, and even those who have the means to spend 8-figures on a house, on the spot, no questions asked, are holding out for bargains, like common riff-raff. Read more »

Back in August, a man wearing a “fedora-style hat and sunglasses” walked into the People’s United bank at 410 Greenwich Avenue, suggested he had a weapon, and “fled with an undisclosed amount of cash.” The event was probably extremely traumatic for the employees and customers present, and not a fun thing for the bank to have to deal with. More importantly, though? The hour-long suspension of the New Haven train line while police hunted for the suspect really inconvenienced commuters, who had better things to do (clean out their DVRs) than stand around with their thumbs up their ass. So annoyed were they by the hold up that it wouldn’t be out of the realm of possibility to assume someone might perform a citizen’s arrest using excessive force on Mr. Fedora, who is apparently back in town. Read more »

At 4:57 p.m., a man [wearing a fedora-style hat and sunglasses] seen by witnesses loitering outside the People’s United Bank at 410 Greenwich Ave. walked into the branch, approached a teller and implied he had a weapon, but did not show it, police said. He then fled with an undisclosed amount of cash. Service on the busy New Haven Line was suspended for about an hour at the start of the evening commute. Trains resumed service about 6 p.m., but commuters faced delays of about an hour, according to Metro-North. When Matt Stymacks made his way to the northbound platform in Greenwich at “5 o’clock on the dot,” he said he noticed one or two police cars. “It looked nonchalant,” said Stymacks. “I noticed that they were scurrying for a bit and then out of nowhere, they had AK47s on them and police dogs and they were screaming at everyone to clear the platform immediately.” The number of police cars multiplied from two to about a dozen, he said; he never heard any gunfire. “Initially it was just very strange, because the first thing you notice is that the police have guns and dogs, so you have to assume that whoever they’re looking for appears to be a danger not just to themselves, but to everyone around,” he said. “So for a brief moment, everybody was pretty freaked out.” But as the minutes ticked away, the mood on the platform shifted from anxiousness to impatience. “There wasn’t any explanation from the cops as to what they were looking for and they weren’t telling us, `Hey, look for a person with said description.’ They just wanted everyone away from the platform — and there wasn’t any communication as far as how long it would take.” [CT Post, CF]

Among the many reasons typically cited by hedge fund managers who choose to run their business out of Connecticut instead of New York are: 1. The room to stretch their shit out 2. Proximity to the Long Island Sound 3. Convenience for those already living in the area. Some probably also believe that the Fairfield County is slightly safer than New York City. That you’re not going to get jumped walking out of the office or beaten with a tire iron because you messed with someone’s man or woman. OR WILL YOU? Read more »

Exhibit A:

Friday morning at AQR, August 10. Cliff Asness glanced pensively at a candy-colored array of Marvel superhero figurines lined up along his east-facing window. Spiderman. Captain America. The Hulk. Iron Man. Comic book heroes of his boyhood days on Long Island.The Quants, by Scott Patterson, page 100.

“Hedge funds charge far too much in general by claiming to be geniuses,” says Asness, lounging on a sofa in his corner office, surrounded by foot-high plastic models of comic book heroes like Captain America and Spider-Man.  Fortune, December 19, 2011

As a child, Clifford Scott Asness gave no sign of his future as a Wall Street tycoon. He was born in October 1966 in Queens, New York. When he was four, his family moved to the leafy suburban environs of Roslyn Heights on Long Island. In school Asness received good grades, but his interest in Wall Street didn’t extend beyond the dark towers of Gotham in the pages of Batman. Obsessed with little besides girls and comic books, Asness was a listless teenager, without direction and somewhat overweight. At times he showed signs of a violent temper that would erupt years later when he sat at the helm of his own hedge fund.The Quants, by Scott Patterson, page 12.

“His super-villains are intellectual dishonesty and ignorance,” says Jonathan Beinner, a managing director at Goldman Sachs Group Inc. and a former classmate of Asness. “When someone offers an opinion that Cliff feels is incorrect or dishonest, whether it be related to investments, politics or pizza, he feels it is his duty to stand up, even if it’s not in his best interest.” Asness admits to a superhero complex. His favorite Marvel comic book character is Captain America, who gains strength with the help of a secret serum and whose shield can be used as an indestructible weapon. Asness has an image of the shield tattooed on his left arm.Bloomberg Markets Magazine, October 7, 2010

Exhibit B:
Read more »

Sleep Where Vikram Pandit Hath Slept

Bloomberg reports that Uncle Vik has put his 6-bedroom, 6-bath Greenwich, CT weekend house on the market and while experts are skeptical he’ll get the $4.3 million asking price, perhaps someone will consider throwing him a bone. Citi shareholders have screwed him yet again and he could use the cash. No zen garden to speak of (cruel world) but there are “rolling grounds” and a lagoon-like pool. Make him an offer.