high frequency trading

A federal appeals court found that making Goldman angry is not a violation of federal law, freeing poor old Sergey so that he could face the same charges in state court. But making Ken Griffin angry? That’s a whole other story—one that could involve 20 years in prison for a plucky 26-year-old programmer who Citadel politely asked to stop downloading its secret sauce onto personal hard drives, but who kept doing it anyway. Read more »

It’s because he has to. Read more »

And the flaxen-maned former CFTC commissioner said it—basically the same high-frequency traders aren’t evil but should be regulated stuff he pedaled during his regulatory years—with nary a metaphor or folklore reference in sight. Read more »

Antony Jenkins, promoted to run Barclays Plc after the Libor scandal, pledged to overhaul the bank’s culture, committing to values of integrity and respect. Allegations of fraud on his watch are undermining his plan. Barclays lied to customers and masked the role of high-frequency traders as it sought to boost revenue at one of Wall Street’s largest private trading venues, New York Attorney General Eric Schneiderman said in a civil complaint filed June 25. He cited a pattern of misleading and false representations that went on as recently as April. The first allegations of new misconduct since Jenkins was named chief executive officer of the London-based bank in August 2012 mark a setback in his efforts to break with the past and sent shares plunging the most since he took over. A hit to the reputation of the Barclays LX dark pool also would hinder Jenkins’s effort to turn around the firm’s investment bank by focusing on equities. [Bloomberg]

Chad Johnson, head of New York’s Investor Protection Bureau, told a conference today that while Attorney General Eric Schneiderman examines trading practices, Wall Street should help by suggesting ways to change for the better. It would be a mistake to think concerns about stock-market fairness are just bad publicity or extreme language used by critics, he said…He welcomed moves by some dark pools to make certain regulatory filings public. He said he hopes high-frequency trading firms and dark-pool operators “will engage in some soul-searching and step forward with ideas about how certain practices ought to be curtailed and reformed for the better.” [Bloomberg]

The government wants to make sure that the Elect are remaining on a righteous path. Read more »

They won’t be able to enforce it, but they’ll promulgate the rule all the same. Read more »