insider-trading

Rajat Gupta, the former Goldman Sachs Group director convicted in a 2012 insider trading scheme tied to the Galleon Group LLC hedge fund, agreed to surrender to prison authorities on June 17 to begin a two-year sentence, a federal judge in Manhattan said. Gupta, 65, lost a bid for a new trial last month, when a three-judge appeals panel upheld his conviction. U.S. District Judge Jed Rakoff said in an order made public today that Gupta and prosecutors consented to the surrender date. [Bloomberg]

In the spring of 2001, though he didn’t know it at the time, Mathew Martoma made a horrible mistake. After being expelled from Harvard Law School for falsifying his transcripts, Martoma (né Thomas) applied, was accepted to, and ultimately chose to attend Stanford’s Graduate School of Business. While having an MBA on his resumé may have helped Martoma in the short-term, years later it would cause him immeasurable heartache, when Stanford stripped him of his degree, deciding that it was too good to have a convicted insider trading among its alums. One business school not too good to embrace a person convicted of securities fraud? University of Southern California’s Marshall School of Business. Danny Kuo found this out when he was looking for some sort of diversion to keep his mind off of the possibility of going to prison in 2012. Read more »

  • 16 Apr 2014 at 4:40 PM

Steve Cohen Needs Your Best Trade Ideas

He’s got 90 days to make his fine back. Can he do it? With your help, he just might. Read more »

  • 10 Apr 2014 at 12:50 PM

Judge Shows Mercy On SAC Capital

$1.8 billion fine and not a penny more, probably. Read more »

…and that $13.9 million in civil penalties, on top of the two years in prison he’s supposed to serve after being convicted of insider trading, plus the scratch he owes Goldman for sharing its material non-public information with a hedge fund friend, is taking things too far. Read more »

…on Thursday, U.S. District Judge Laura Swain is scheduled to punctuate the firm’s remarkable downfall when she rules on its plea to criminal insider-trading charges. If Judge Swain accepts the plea, as expected, the firm will pay an additional $1.2 billion in penalties, including the largest criminal fine ever in an insider-trading case. Since the guilty plea last November, portfolio managers who oversaw more than 10% of SAC’s capital have either left or announced plans to leave, according to people familiar with the firm’s operations. “How could I tell my kids I stayed at a firm that admitted to insider trading?” said one former employee. [WSJ]

Remember Frank Perkins Hixon Jr.? Made something of a name for himself when he became the first Evercore employee in history to be accused of insider trading, which he apparently did in part to raise funds to support the child he had with Destiny Wind Robinson? He may be going away for a while. Also, he’s sorry. Read more »