insider-trading

So far the defense team has only one (Martoma was only responsible for $49 million out of the $276 million SAC Capital made based on inside information about Elan and Wyeth) but by late July? Hoo-boy, you just wait. It’ll be a regular BuzzFeed article up in that courtroom (20 Reasons Why Mathew Martoma Should Serve Far Fewer Years Than The Government’s Recommended Sentence). Read more »

The sentencing of former SAC Capital Advisors LP hedge fund manager Mathew Martoma, who faces what may be the longest insider trading prison-term in history, will be delayed following a defense request for additional time, a court clerk said. Martoma, 40, was convicted in February in what prosecutors have called the biggest insider trading scheme ever by an individual. He could face almost 20 years in prison for trading on illegal tips about an Alzheimer’s drug made by Elan Corp. and Wyeth LLC that gained SAC $276 million and earned him a $9.3 million bonus. Martoma’s lawyers requested in a letter to U.S. District Judge Paul Gardephe last week that the June 10 sentencing be postponed for more than a month, citing a late report by the court’s Probation Department. [Bloomberg]

After a high-profile setback involving a certain outspoken NBA owner (not that one), the SEC thought it had figured out how to get a jury to see things its way. Did one not just find that a Texas septuagenarian was every bit the conniving fraudster that the SEC said he was?

Well, Mary Jo White & co.’s winning streak did not last long, so they’re doing what it takes to prevent the start of another losing streak. Read more »

At any other time, fine, Billy Walters could deal with the fact that federal authorities are reportedly “examining a series of well-timed trades” made by him and golfer Phil Mickelson, that Carl Icahn may or may not have mentioned in passing to the the men. But not now. Not when he’s gearing up for the fourth annual “World’s Sexiest Golf Tournament,” which is less than three months away and needs his undivided attention. Read more »

  • 02 Jun 2014 at 1:59 PM

Carl Icahn Puts The Wall Street Journal On Notice

In a telephone interview with Bloomberg Television’s Trish Regan, billionaire investor Carl Icahn responded to articles in the Wall Street Journal and the New York Times over the weekend suggesting he was implicated in an insider trading investigation. The investigation, which is being conducted by the FBI, the Securities and Exchange Commission, and federal prosecutors in Manhattan, also involves three-time Masters golf tournament winner Phil Mickelson and Las Vegas gambling impresario Billy Walters. “We do not know of any investigation. Further, we are always very careful to observe all legal requirements in all of our activities,” Icahn said. “We believe that making inflammatory and speculative statements, especially when we’ve had an unblemished record for 50 years, is completely irresponsible on the part of the Wall Street Journal.” [BusinessWeek]

Titan Capital Management co-founder Steven Slawson has had his troubles in the past, but now he’s really in the soup, what with the criminal insider-trading charges in a case that has already won three guilty pleas. Oh, yeah, and with his alleged source ready to hop up onto the witness stand to tell a jury about all of the money Slawson paid him for inside dirt on a child’s clothing company.

No matter: Slawson is positively eager for the chance to prove that professedly innocent people can stay out of jail under such circumstances. Read more »

Rajat Gupta, the Goldman Sachs director who waited but 23 seconds after a Goldman board meeting to call hedge fund manager Raj Rajaratnam with material, non-public information, has lost his bid to stay out of jail. Read more »