insider-trading

Mathew Martoma has not had the best luck over the last number of years. First, he was charged with masterminding the “most lucrative insider trading scheme ever,” during his time at SAC Capital. Then, over the course of his trial, it came out that he’d doctored his transcripts while at Harvard Law School, which resulted in his expulsion. Later, of course, a jury found him guilty of securities fraud. And finally, when he was really down, perhaps at the lowest he’d ever been, Stanford’s business school had to go and take away his MBA, to boot. Still, Martoma his hoping his string of bad luck is finally up and is asking a judge to grant him this one thing. Read more »

2014: Not a good year to be named Steve A. Cohen. For any expecting parents out there thinking about going with S.A.C., consider Bill or Ted instead. Moving forward perhaps thing one should fall under names we don’t give kids anymore, like Mussolini or Stalin. Read more »

To be fair, we don’t actually know 1) how much money was raised and 2) if his friend needed a heart. It could’ve been a kidney or liver or a lung. What we do know is that U.S. District Judge Richard Sullivan was somehow unmoved by this argument, made on behalf of ex-SAC employee and convicted insider trader Mike Steinberg: Read more »

Just seconds after the prosecutor arguing the appeal introduced herself, the judges grilled her about the case and implied that Mr. Bharara’s office steered insider trading trials to Judge Richard J. Sullivan, who oversaw Mr. Chiasson’s and Mr. Newman’s trial and a subsequent case against another trader. The questioning appeared to send a cautionary message to Judge Sullivan, who is known for often siding with the government, and took a swipe at prosecutors for cherry-picking judges. Judge Barrington D. Parker — interrupting the prosecutor, Antonia M. Apps — referred to Judge Sullivan as the government’s apparent “preferred venue” for insider trading cases. While Ms. Apps argued that consolidating the cases created “judicial efficiencies,” another member of the appellate panel noted the “sheer coincidence that the judge who bought into the government’s theory was the one” assigned to the recent trials. [Dealbook]

As you’ve no doubt noticed, a number of hedge fund managers have in recent years been found guilty by a jury of their peers of insider-trading, a nebulous and gray-area-filled offense that some people think perhaps should not be illegal but which, all the same, is, and which conviction of said crime carries with it the potential for quite a few years in a place where pampered financiers don’t always get the best of it. Given the latter, everyone who has been found so guilty by said jury of said peers has asked judges with higher pay grades to find that, in spite of their deep and abiding faith in American jurisprudence, 12 ordinary men and women committed a grave miscarriage of justice against them.

To date, none have succeeded, or really even come close to succeeding. So it is likely to be for Anthony Chiasson and Todd Newman, late of the late Level Global Investors and the late Diamondback Capital Management, respectively, who got rolled by their former analysts for the sharing of and trading in all manner of secret sauce about Dell Inc. and other technology companies. But man oh man, what if they did succeed where all others have failed? Let’s just say you could cancel that twice-life-size bronze monument to Preet Bharara planned for Foley Square. Read more »

Rajat Gupta, the former Goldman Sachs Group director convicted in a 2012 insider trading scheme tied to the Galleon Group LLC hedge fund, agreed to surrender to prison authorities on June 17 to begin a two-year sentence, a federal judge in Manhattan said. Gupta, 65, lost a bid for a new trial last month, when a three-judge appeals panel upheld his conviction. U.S. District Judge Jed Rakoff said in an order made public today that Gupta and prosecutors consented to the surrender date. [Bloomberg]

In the spring of 2001, though he didn’t know it at the time, Mathew Martoma made a horrible mistake. After being expelled from Harvard Law School for falsifying his transcripts, Martoma (né Thomas) applied, was accepted to, and ultimately chose to attend Stanford’s Graduate School of Business. While having an MBA on his resumé may have helped Martoma in the short-term, years later it would cause him immeasurable heartache, when Stanford stripped him of his degree, deciding that it was too good to have a convicted insider trading among its alums. One business school not too good to embrace a person convicted of securities fraud? University of Southern California’s Marshall School of Business. Danny Kuo found this out when he was looking for some sort of diversion to keep his mind off of the possibility of going to prison in 2012. Read more »