insider-trading

Dr. Ross said that after their initial meeting, during which he confirmed the confidential side effect, he began regularly sharing trial results with Mr. Martoma about the patients he was giving the drug to, in breach of his confidentiality agreement with Elan. Dr. Ross said that in addition to the consultation fees, he was motivated by tapping Mr. Martoma’s contacts in the pharmaceutical and financial-services industry to help his new clinical-testing business, Iberica USA. In May 2008, Dr. Ross emailed Mr. Martoma asking for connections. “I have now opened the [testing center] as you know, and need to contact as many small biotech companies as possible,” Dr. Ross wrote in an email that was shown to jurors Tuesday. “I appreciate your help, and will be happy to return the courtesy in other ways.” Those “other ways” were sharing confidential trial results, as he had done before, according to Dr. Ross Mr. Martoma responded in another email shown to the jury that the courtesies weren’t needed, and he was happy to help a “friend.” But Dr. Ross said Tuesday the two weren’t friends. “It was more of a professional relationship on a contractual basis,” he said. [WSJ]

  • 13 Jan 2014 at 12:00 PM

Exclusive Preview: Harvard Law School Class Notes

1999: ARLO DEVLIN-BROWN Law ’99 writes that you never know where you’ll run into a classmate. He is prosecuting MATHEW MARTOMA (nee Thomas) ’99* on insider trading charges in Lower Manhattan. Devlin-Brown has asked U.S. District Judge Paul Gardephe (unfortunately Penn ’79, Columbia ’82) for permission to talk about Matt’s expulsion from Harvard for doctoring his transcript, so get ready for fireworks! The trial is expected to last several weeks, so for anyone who missed WILLIAM PULLMAN and Lisa Frank’s (Yale ’03, NYU Law ’08, NYU Stern ’08) Christmas Eve nuptials, it would be a great opportunity for a mini-reunion!” Read more »

Yesterday we learned that Mathew Martoma, on trial for orchestrating “the largest insider trading scheme in history,” got himself expelled from Harvard Law School 15 years ago for creating fake transcripts to boost his grades. Obviously, this is not a great thing to have come to light if you are about to ask a jury to believe you are an innocent man, particularly if the judge presiding over your case is going to allow the story to be included by the prosecution.

But apparently changing his Civil Procedure grade from B to A (Contracts from B+ to A; Criminal Law B to A) was but a warm up for the deluge of lies the artist formerly known as Ajai Mathew Thomas would go on to tell! The subsequent ones, courtesy of the findings of Harvard’s administrative board, included:

  • Claiming the fake transcript was only meant to be seen by his parents

Mr. Thomas asserts that he did not purposefully send the judges the altered transcript. He contends that they received it by accident. According to Mr. Thomas, he altered his transcript only for the purpose of deceiving his parents.

  • Blaming the mix up on his brother

At the end of December of in early January, Mr. Thomas’s application for a clerkship was sent to 23 judges in the United States Court of Appeals. The applications included the altered transcript. . . . Mr. Thomas has stated that it was his intention that the real transcript be sent with his applications. According to his statement, he arranged with his brother for the latter to prepare the packets of materials for mailing to each judge; his brother came across the altered transcript and, mistakenly believing that it was the real transcript, included it with the application.

  • Potentially the best lie among the lot, the one in which he said that after he was asked to interview with the judges who received the altered grades, he tried his hardest to come off as a candidate they wouldn’t want to hire…

On January 26 and 27, Mr. Thomas interviewed for a clerkship with Judge Sentelle, Judge Randolph, and Judge Ginsburg of the United States Court of Appeals for the D.C. Circuit. Mr. Thomas did not disclose to the judges that the transcript that they had received was not accurate…Mr. Thomas has stated that it was his intention, in order to avoid any harmful effect from the altered transcript, not to be offered a clerkship and that he tried not to be a successful candidate at the interviews.

  • …but damn it, they saw through his act!

Read more »

Before Mathew Martoma was (allegedly!) telling Steve Cohen to dump large positions in Elan and Wyeth based on inside information he received from a doctor involved in clinical trials of an Alzheimer’s drug, he was making fake transcripts of his grades at Harvard Law School. Read more »

Horvath took home a relative pittance of $416,084 of compensation in 2007, compared with Steinberg’s $5.1 million. He rang in the New Year vowing to do better. He cultivated a relationship with Jesse Tortora, an analyst at a hedge fund called Diamondback Capital, whom he’d met through a former roommate in San Francisco. Tortora was well connected and started funneling him inside information about Dell, which, Horvath later testified, he passed up to Steinberg. [BusinessWeek / Sheelah Kolhatkar]

Mathew Martoma, the latest employee of Steven A. Cohen’s SAC Capital Advisors to face trial on insider trading charges, lost a bid on Friday to delay his trial, which is scheduled to start on January 6. Martoma’s lawyer, Roberto Braceras, told U.S. District Judge Paul Gardephe in New York that the conviction of SAC portfolio manager Michael Steinberg on Wednesday had ignited a new round of media stories that often mentioned Martoma, raising the possibility jurors could be tainted by the coverage. He asked for a two-week delay, adding that they needed the extra time to prepare for trial in light of several pending motions. But Gardephe said he had already postponed the trial from the autumn to January “extremely reluctantly,” adding that the intense media attention on SAC would likely continue. “The fact of the matter is, there is a piece of news about SAC nearly every day,” he said. [Reuters]

As of Monday morning, SAC trader Michael Steinberg was innocent against charges of insider trading in the eyes of a juror named Demethress Gordon. But on Monday evening, Gordon “attended a screenwriting class that happened to focus on the subtext of characters’ actions.” And then this happened: Read more »