insider-trading

For the ten SAC Capital employees who have been convicted of securities fraud over the last several years, the results of the government’s crackdown on insider trading are obvious: time in the big house, fines, and the dream of being being honored as a distinguished alumni of Stanford Business School dashed. For SAC founder Steve Cohen, too, the impact is clear: no more outside investors, a new layers of management– a cocoon, if you will– between him and his traders, and a giant metal ‘S’ ‘A’ and ‘C’, which once graced the wall of the firm’s lobby rendered completely useless.

For another group of people, though, the effect of multi-year investigation is less clear: the hundreds of SAC employees who did not engage in insider trading. Specifically, what having the hedge fund soon to formerly be known as SAC Capital on their resumés means for their professional lives and long-term career plans. Would it be the equivalent of a scarlet ‘S’ on their chests? Would hiring managers blow them off in a “seat’s taken” kind of way? Would they have to burn their fleeces and any other evidence of having once been associated with the firm? Would they stand in the shower scrubbing their skin raw in an attempt to get the SAC stench out, after a particularly unpleasant meeting with a potential employer who announced flatly that he could “still smell them on [you]“? Would they have to leave town, and start over in a place where no one had ever heard of SAC Capital? Read more »

From 2010 to 2014, when he was working in Evercore’s mining and metals group, Frank Perkins Hixon Jr. occasionally found himself on the receiving end of material non-public information. Sometimes it was about forthcoming acquisitions. Sometimes it was about his own company’s earnings. In both cases, FPH Jr. knew he could sweeten things for himself by trading on the 411. Naturally, he didn’t want to get fired from Evercore for securities fraud, as it would put a damper on his ability to obtain inside info, so he couldn’t be too obvious. Placing the trades in an account under his own name was obviously out. Same went for anyone with whom he shared a last name, like his mom or dad. And that’s when the lightbulb went off: Read more »

Much like being a first, second, or third year analyst on Wall Street, a lot of being a non-partner employee at a law firm is being shit on. Not respected. Treated like an idiot. That many of these attorneys have six-figure debt and are, in some cases, decades out of their early twenties makes the day to day treatment by their superiors all the more harsh. They can’t ease the pain with a visit to the Murray Hill Brother Jimmy’s; all the can do is go home and wonder “What kind of a life is this? Why do I put up with this,” cry, or some combination thereof. Some quit; others resign themselves to the way of life; a select few go out and get drunk on pinot grigio and decide, “I’m not some paper pusher. I’m an an esquire. I’m important. I know stuff. I’m gonna show them. I’m gonna show ALL of them [knocks over glass].” Read more »

At least one person isn’t happy about the pending insider trading settlement between the government and SAC Capital Advisors LP and isn’t afraid to make that known — anonymously. In an anonymous email to U.S. District Judge Laura Taylor Swain, who is presiding over the criminal portion of SAC’s settlement, the critic had harsh words for the Justice Department and SAC’s billionaire founder Steven A. Cohen. “LTS, you must be tough like [Judge] Rakoff, kill the plea deal now that SAC trader Mathew Martoma is convicted to force DoJ to put Steve Cohen behind bars,” the person wrote. “His billions were made by insider trading and stolen from investors.” [WSJ]

*Assuming you can’t get them imported to the joint.

  • 10 Feb 2014 at 2:01 PM

Rengan Rajaratnam: I’m telling mom!

Rengan Rajaratnam, the younger brother of imprisoned hedge fund manager Raj Rajaratnam, urged a U.S. judge on Friday to dismiss insider trading charges leveled against him last year. In a motion filed in U.S. District Court in New York, his lawyers argued the government had taken positions in the indictment that contradicted positions prosecutors took in trying his older brother for insider trading. “Principles of fairness dictate that Rengan, at a minimum, should be tried under the same standard as Raj,” the defense lawyers wrote in the motion. [Reuters]


[via The Chronicle]

No word yet from the Stanford Daily, from which Martoma received his MBA after the misunderstanding re: fake and real transcripts at Harvard Law.

Jurors in Manhattan have reached a guilty verdict in the insider-trading trial of Mathew Martoma, the former SAC Capital Advisors LP portfolio manager accused of insider trading. The jury said Martoma used inside tips on trades that earned SAC $275 million. [WSJ, earlier]