Jack Welch

Former General Electric CEO Jack Welch says Apple deserves better than the treatment it’s getting from David Einhorn, the hedge-fund manager pressuring the iPhone maker to cough up dividends. “Look, these guys are after a quick hit. I’d blow him off,” he told CNBC’s “Closing Bell.” “I’d give Einhorn the back of my hand.” Welch said he had the same kind of problem with activist investors while heading GE. “They’d come after us, ‘What are you going to do with all that cash?’ Well, we’re going to do a smart thing! Trust us!” Welch said. [CNBC, related, related]

  • 05 Nov 2012 at 3:27 PM

Jack Welch Still Thinking Things

One day before the presidential election, the former General Electric Co. chief executive officer again suggested that government figures on employment are being manipulated for political gain. “Every fact says we don’t have a booming economy,” Welch said today in an interview on CNBC. “Something’s wacky here. I didn’t think it was right.” [Bloomberg, earlier]

Jack Welch said he will no longer contribute to Fortune following critical coverage of the former CEO of General Electric, saying he would get better “traction” elsewhere. On Friday, Welch suggested that the Obama administration, calling them “these Chicago guys,” had manipulated the monthly jobs report in order to make the economy look better than it actually is just weeks before the election…CNNMoney, which shares content with Fortune.com, ran a story on Friday covering Welch’s tweet. The piece said that even conservative economists thought Welch was wrong to question the jobs numbers. On Tuesday, Fortune.com ran a story detailing Welch’s record as a job destroyer. GE lost nearly 100,000 jobs during the 20 years in which Welch ran the company. “I never put myself out there as an employment agency,” Welch told Fortune…Following the story, Welch sent an e-mail to Reuters’ Steve Adler and Serwer saying that he and his wife Suzy, who have jointly written for Reuters and Fortune in the past, were “terminating our contract” and will no longer be sending our “material to Fortune.” Reuters’ story about Welch’s tweet quoted money manager and blogger Barry Ritholtz, who said Welch’s comments were laughable. Reuters wrote that Ritholtz comments were referring to allegations that Welch regularly manipulated GE’s earnings during his tenure as CEO in order to best Wall Street profit estimates. [Fortune, related]

Despite a jam-packed day with no time to comment to reporters, Jack Welch interrupted his schedule this afternoon to tell the Journal he “wasn’t kidding” about his Tweet this morning that the most recent jobs data had been gotten to. Again, because he is so busy, Welch did not have time to elaborate, but he wanted to make sure that was clear. He jokes a lot so he wasn’t sure if it was. [WSJ, earlier]

Jack Welch, writing on his Twitter account, said the Obama administration manipulated U.S. employment data for political gain by showing a drop in the jobless rate. “Unbelievable jobs numbers..these Chicago guys will do anything..can’t debate so change numbers,” the former General Electric chief executive officer said in a message posted immediately after the U.S. Labor Department reported that the unemployment rate fell to 7.8 percent last month, the lowest since President Barack Obama took office in January 2009. The Obama administration denied the allegation as baseless and defended the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, which computes the figures…Welch is in meetings today and isn’t available for comment, said Rosanne Badowski, his executive assistant. She said Welch is the only one with access to the Twitter account. [Bloomberg]

“Be likable. Just that. Fun, upbeat, friendly, authentic, filled with positive energy, happy, agreeable, chit-chatty about sports and the weather and The Avengers, or frankly, whatever everyone at your company likes to be chit-chatty about. Get in the game and play, even literally, if there’s a softball game to be had. Let people know you. Let them hear you laugh. Let them see your humanity.” [Reuters]


[New York Times]

1. What does he bench?
2. Would it have killed the photographer to get a shot of him wailing on his pecs?
3. Does that polo wick sweat?
4. How does he find the motivation on the days working out is the last thing he wants to do?
5. Will there be a follow-up story and series of photos featuring him going head to head with James D. Robinson III (far left), the former chairman of American Express who “can leg-press 900 pounds, leaving fellow gym members in awe.” (“I wanted to do 1,000, but they wouldn’t let me,” Robinson told the Times.) Read more »

During the financial crisis, the markets were on edge. This was before the big firms blew up, I remember saying on the air, “Well, you’re going to get some commentary from teh ratings agencies.” The companies that were insuring all the big banks just didn’t have the money to insure them. So basically they all lost their triple-A ratings. I said that and the market moved 200 points. I remember walking into San Pietro, a restaurant in Manhattan where a lot of these guys had lunch and I saw Jack Welch, who came up to me and said, “Charlie, you’re doing great but watch this whole notion of moving the markets. Just watch it or you’ll get your brains blown out.” I said, “Literally?” He said, “No, but it’s a dangerous, dangerous thing.” [New Canaan-Darien Magazine]