Jamie Dimon

  • 20 May 2014 at 9:23 AM

Jamie Dimon Has A Five-Year Plan

JP Morgan Chase & Co. Chief Executive Officer James Dimon has told investors he wants to stay with the largest U.S. bank for as many as five more years, according to people familiar with the conversation. “I’m going nowhere,” Mr. Dimon said during an April 23 lunch at a hotel overlooking Boston Harbor, according to people who attended…The new clarity is a contrast to comments made by the 58-year-old Mr. Dimon a year ago as he hinted in a private meeting with investors he might leave the bank if shareholders voted to separate his roles of chief executive and chairman, according to people familiar with that conversation. [WSJ]

  • 12 May 2014 at 9:45 AM

Layoffs Watch ’14: JP Morgan

The House of Morgan is expected to lay off a whole bunch of employees this year. Those cuts, along with increased regulatory pressure, will somehow supposedly, eventually, cause Jamie Dimon to decide his gig as CEO is not worth the trouble and quit to become a shepherd, according to analyst Dick Bové. Read more »

  • 07 May 2014 at 4:08 PM

Glass Lewis Wants To Know Where JPMorgan Gets Off

…paying its top executives like they’re hot shit, when, in reality, they’re no better than, I don’t know, Citigroup. Read more »

  • 11 Feb 2014 at 2:23 PM

Make John Mack’s Day: Give Jamie and Lloyd A Break

In an interview on Bloomberg TV, John J. Mack, the former chairman and chief executive of Morgan Stanley, called for an end to the harsh words that have been hurled at Mr. Dimon and Lloyd C. Blankfein, Goldman Sachs’s chief executive, over their pay…He said he would love to see people “stop beating up on Lloyd and Jamie.” He added: “I think that would make a lot of sense, and I’m in favor of that.” [Dealbook] Read more »

But a confidential email has emerged that shows a top Chinese regulator directly asked Jamie Dimon, the bank’s chief executive, for a “favor” to hire a young job applicant. The applicant, a family friend of the regulator, now works at JPMorgan. Mr. Dimon met the applicant in June 2012, according to interviews and the previously unreported email, one of several documents that JPMorgan recently turned over to federal authorities as part of an investigation into hiring at the bank. At the meeting with Mr. Dimon in New York, the applicant acted as an interpreter for the Chinese insurance regulator. JPMorgan bankers in Hong Kong, hoping to help her job prospects, knew in advance that she would attend…As the meeting with Mr. Dimon was wrapping up, interviews and the confidential email show, Mr. Xiang changed the subject to his young interpreter. He introduced her to Mr. Dimon and portrayed her as the daughter of a close friend and a potential JPMorgan employee. In an awkward moment for the applicant, she translated as Mr. Xiang extolled the benefits of hiring her. [Dealbook]

Frank Bisignano isn’t coming right out and saying he’s sorry that his company hired all of those JPMCers right after he quit, but he is offering an olive branch wrapped with a novelty-sized check. Read more »

  • 24 Jan 2014 at 1:38 PM

Bitcoin In Jamie Dimon’s 2014 Death Pool

Bitcoin has been tossed into the virtual gutter at the World Economic Forum in Davos this week, as top US financial leaders warned the vitrual currency could be used to fund terrorism and predicted that regulation would put it out of business. Jack Lew, US Treasury secretary, said: “From the government’s point of view, we have to make sure it does not become an avenue to funding illegal activities or to funding activities that have malign purposes like terrorist activities. High quality global journalism requires investment. “It is an anonymous form of transaction and it offers places for people to hide,” Mr Lew said in an interview with CNBC at Davos. Jamie Dimon, JPMorgan chairman and chief executive, told the same channel: “The question isn’t whether we accept it. The question is do we even participate with people who facilitate Bitcoin?” Ultimately, Mr Dimon said, Bitcoin would be subjected to the same regulatory standards as other payment systems and “that will probably be the end of them”. [FT]