John Paulson

As you may have heard, after occupying downtown Manhattan for the last 25 days, those protesting Wall Street (etc) announced that they’d be making a trip up North, with stops at the Upper East Side homes of, among others, Jamie Dimon and John Paulson. Before they made an appearance at the Paulson and Co founder’s house, JP issued the following statement/suggestion:

“The top 1% of New Yorkers pay over 40% of all income taxes, providing huge benefits to everyone in our city and state. Paulson & Co. and its employees have paid hundreds of millions of dollars in New York City and New York State taxes in recent years and have created over 100 high paying jobs in New York City since its formation. New York currently has the highest income taxes of any state in the country and thousands of businesses have fled New York to states with no income taxes such as Florida, Texas and Nevada, or moved offshore.

Instead of vilifying our most successful businesses, we should be supporting them and encouraging them to remain in New York City and continue to grow.”

Apparently organizers of the march were not swayed and after choosing not to take the advice, made their planned stop at Paulson’s townhouse, where they left him a (slightly mixed) message of their own. Read more »

Paulson And Co Investors Standing By Their Man


John Paulson, the billionaire hedge- fund manager having the worst year of his career, has received less than 10 percent in redemption requests for his Recovery and Credit Opportunities funds for year’s end, according to two people familiar with the firm. Withdrawal orders for those two funds, which together managed about $15 billion as of July 31, were due at the end of September and may give some indication of what total redemptions could be across all of Paulson’s funds, the worst-performing of which has tumbled 47 percent this year…“We’re going to give Paulson the benefit of the doubt,” said Trip Kuehne, founder of Double Eagle Capital Management LP, a Dallas-based firm that has invested with Paulson since 2005. “I believe in him and his firm and don’t plan to pull my money.” [Bloomberg]

One of the stocks in Paulson’s portfolio, Alpha Natural Resources, is getting clobbered today after the company and rival Walter Energy warned that output for steelmaking-coal will fall short of expectations…Paulson’s bet on Alpha Natural Resources is a relatively small chunk of his portfolio, but it is another ill-timed wager this year from the man who made a fortune from smart wagers against subprime bonds. [WSJ]

Think again. Read more »

  • 19 Aug 2011 at 4:38 PM

John Paulson Can’t Catch A Break

Paulson made a surprise disclosure in May that he started buying Hewlett-Packard shares during the early part of 2011. His Paulson & Co. hedge fund is hardly known for plowing money into tech stocks, so the buying binge was eye-opening. … Unfortunately for Paulson and other investors, H-P shares have been clobbered in 2011, even before today’s decline. Based on back of the envelope math, Paulson’s paper loss on H-P is more than $500 million. [Deal Journal]

  • 17 Aug 2011 at 6:47 PM

Just Paulson Has Seen Better Summers

The market volatility of last week was not kind to the hedge fund behemoth John Paulson, whose flagship fund was down 34 percent through Friday’s close, according to an investor who was briefed on the performance today…Paulson’s merger funds are faring considerably better, though still in the red with the enhanced levered fund down 7 percent year to date and the unlevered fund down 3 percent year to date. [CNBC]

ironically fake john paulson buys real trees

With half of Europe having banned short-selling and anything that might loosely resemble it, if you think that French banks are undercapitalized then you may be seeking less traditional ways to monetize that view. One approach that you might have considered is writing a fictional account of a near-future Eurozone meltdown with real names of banks and individuals and selling it pseudonymously to a major French newspaper to publish in a twelve-part serial. If you live in the U.S. that may not sound like such a great idea, since we don’t consume a lot of based-loosely-on-real-events financial fiction unless it stars Shia LeBoeuf.

But in France, where after all mime is considered a form of entertainment, there seems to be a big appetite for fictionalized financial markets, as Le Monde found out when they puplished “Terminus pour l’euro” this summer. But Le Monde’s success may just have ruined it for the rest of you:
Read more »