JPMorgan

When last we checked in with Javier Martin-Artajo, his attorney was telling the press that he was on vacation and had no plans or reason to believe it was necessary to cut said vacation short. Now this is happening: Read more »

If a certain someone can’t get to the phone, any old professional athlete with a knack for pumping up the beaten down will do. Read more »

[@cgasparino, related]

  • 27 Aug 2013 at 2:57 PM

Taxonomical Issue Costs JPMorgan Chase $50 Million

Jamie Dimon & Co. owe Leonard Blavatnik half the money they lost him on mortgage-backed securities because they called some MBS something other than MBS. But it could have been worse! Read more »

Former JP Morgan trader Javier Martin-Artajo was released after telling a Madrid court he opposed attempts by U.S. prosecutors to extradite him on charges he hid trading losses that cost the bank $6.2 billion. The former trader turned himself in this morning after being contacted by investigators, a Spanish police official said. He was released after a hearing in Madrid today in which he said he was unwilling to be extradited, according to a spokeswoman for the National Court. The U.S. this month charged Martin-Artajo, a Spanish citizen, and Julien Grout, a French citizen, with trying to hide the losses stemming from trades by Bruno Iksil, the Frenchman at the center of the case who became known as the “London Whale.” Grout and Martin-Artajo face as long as 20 years in prison if convicted of the most serious counts, including conspiracy and wire fraud…Martin-Artajo’s lawyer, Lista Cannon, didn’t immediately respond to a call seeking comment today. He “is confident that when a complete and fair reconstruction of these complex events is completed, he will be cleared of any wrongdoing,” a spokeswoman for his law firm said earlier this month. [Bloomberg, Earlier: If There’s Some Reason Indicted JP Morgan Employee Should Cut Vacation Short, Fly To U.S., He Hasn’t Heard It]

Michael Coyne is gonna take off now. Read more »

From here on, the news organization will frown upon comparing the destruction of world-historic landmarks during wartime to unfavorable interest-rate swap settlements forced by JPMorgan Chase. Read more »