junior mistmakers

Hundreds of undergraduates are starting internships at banks this summer, typically eight to 10 weeks with a salary equivalent to £45,000 a year. Soon follow the graduates, starting their careers as banking analysts, earning about £45,000 plus bonus. The median salary reported by university-leavers last year was £20,500… At the banks, there is a concern they might not meet the younger generation’s expectations. Bruce Tulgan, author of Not Everyone Gets a Trophy, characterises this cohort as worldly, precocious and needy. Used to instant feedback and hands-on parenting, they are less likely to toil away quietly, paying their dues. Not yet teenagers on 9/11, they entered university in a recession that made many suspicious of institutions. One graduate had this to say to Mr Tulgan about financiers: “I know they think they are masters of the universe, but the Soviet Union disappeared overnight. So could they.” [FT]

  • 25 Jun 2014 at 10:54 AM

Deustche Bank Asia Hemorrhaging Pitch Book-Makers

DB junior bankers are reportedly accepting opportunities elsewhere en-masse. Read more »

  • 28 Feb 2014 at 2:15 PM

Barclays Cares About Its Junior Bankers Too Ya Know

Like Goldman Sachs, JP Morgan, Bank of America, Credit Suisse, Bank of Montreal, and Citigroup before it, Barclays has decided that all work and no play make for grumpy junior mistmakers. Unlike the “protected weekend” adopted by JPMorgan and Citi, and the 36-hour weekend favored by Goldman Sachs and Credit Suisse, the Brits are taking a three-pronged approach to unshackling its little workers bees from their desks by: making sure they take their vacations, not letting anyone work more than 12 days straight without a break to catch their breath, and forbidding the assigning of projects after 12 on a Friday, unless it’s really important in which case, settle in. Read more »

Like JP Morgan, Citi’s junior bankers will now have one weekend a month to spend as they please (though keep those Blackberries on), according to a memo sent out today. Read more »

Like Bank of America, JP Morgan, and Goldman Sachs before it, Credit Suisse announced this week that analysts and associates will have some semblance of a weekend, moving forward. Unlike JP Morgan’s monthly “protected” weekend and BofA’s “take the number of UNAUTHORIZED weekend days you were previously working and cut it in half,” Credit Suisse has chosen to adopt the Goldman Sachs 36-hour weekend model, unless of course urgent work needs to be done, in which case, consider your ass glued to that desk. Read more »

Following moves by Goldman Sachs and JP Morgan to give junior bankers 36 hours off each weekend and one whole weekend off a month, respectively, Bank of America has announced that its young worker bees should go ahead and think about taking a couple Saturdays or Sundays off every now and again. Read more »

JPMorgan Chase & Co. plans to boost the number of junior investment bankers it employs by about 10 percent and provide them with “protected weekends” to reduce their workload, a person familiar with the matter said. Jeff Urwin, the New York-based company’s global head of investment banking, announced the changes on an internal conference call today, said the person, who didn’t say how many people would be affected and asked not to be identified because the new policies aren’t public. Jennifer Zuccarelli, a spokeswoman for JPMorgan, declined to comment. All of the major Wall Street firms are planning to increase investment-banking staff in 2014, according to Jeanne Branthover, the head of financial-services recruitment at Boyden Global Executive Search in New York. They are also trying to protect their best employees from poaching as average pay at the biggest banks declines. “Business is better and they’ve stayed lean for so long,” Branthover said. “People are burned out.” [Bloomberg, earlier]