junior mistmakers

On Monday night, Citi CEO Mike Corbat appeared on a panel at NYU’s Stern School of Business alongside hedge fund manager John Paulson and private equity chief Joseph Landy. The conversation was free flowing and touched on a number of subjects du jour, like too-big-to-fail, post-crisis regulation, and the future of the global economy, but, as he was speaking before students, Corbat was also there to make the case for people to come work at Citi. Knowing full well that the banking industry in general and Citi specifically probably holds little if any allure for the junior banking set these days, he put on a happy face nonetheless and really committed to the part, telling those assembled:

1. Despite regulatory constraints, it’s still a super fun time to be a banker.
2. Banks are going “digital” so you could think of yourself like a pioneer, on the Oregon Trail.
3. Bottom line: We’re all adults here. Everyone knows you all want to go to a PE firm or hedge fund but not everybody’s gonna because there literally aren’t enough chairs to go around at these places. Their offices aren’t that big, relatively speaking, and there straight up are not enough places for people to sit. I’m not stupid, I get it. Who wouldn’t want to go work for Paulson and Co. over a bank, especially when that bank is Citi. But again, it just comes down to math. So when you get the “We’ll be in touch line” from them, you come give me a call. Read more »

  • 22 Aug 2014 at 2:25 PM

Bonus Watch ’14: Citi Mistmakers

The youngest members of the House of Corbat got a little extra something in their stocking (beach bag? man or lady satchel? giant canvas sack with a dollar sign on it?) this time around. Read more »

  • 20 Aug 2014 at 12:53 PM

Pay Hike Watch ’15: The Youth Of Goldman Sachs

The youngest members of the House of Lloyd are said to be in for a nice little salary bump. Read more »

Banks are said to have made their best offers this week. Read more »

Hundreds of undergraduates are starting internships at banks this summer, typically eight to 10 weeks with a salary equivalent to £45,000 a year. Soon follow the graduates, starting their careers as banking analysts, earning about £45,000 plus bonus. The median salary reported by university-leavers last year was £20,500… At the banks, there is a concern they might not meet the younger generation’s expectations. Bruce Tulgan, author of Not Everyone Gets a Trophy, characterises this cohort as worldly, precocious and needy. Used to instant feedback and hands-on parenting, they are less likely to toil away quietly, paying their dues. Not yet teenagers on 9/11, they entered university in a recession that made many suspicious of institutions. One graduate had this to say to Mr Tulgan about financiers: “I know they think they are masters of the universe, but the Soviet Union disappeared overnight. So could they.” [FT]

  • 25 Jun 2014 at 10:54 AM

Deustche Bank Asia Hemorrhaging Pitch Book-Makers

DB junior bankers are reportedly accepting opportunities elsewhere en-masse. Read more »

  • 28 Feb 2014 at 2:15 PM

Barclays Cares About Its Junior Bankers Too Ya Know

Like Goldman Sachs, JP Morgan, Bank of America, Credit Suisse, Bank of Montreal, and Citigroup before it, Barclays has decided that all work and no play make for grumpy junior mistmakers. Unlike the “protected weekend” adopted by JPMorgan and Citi, and the 36-hour weekend favored by Goldman Sachs and Credit Suisse, the Brits are taking a three-pronged approach to unshackling its little workers bees from their desks by: making sure they take their vacations, not letting anyone work more than 12 days straight without a break to catch their breath, and forbidding the assigning of projects after 12 on a Friday, unless it’s really important in which case, settle in. Read more »