LAPD

His: Los Angeles police officers stopped him while he was trying to buy sleeping aids at a pharmacy, forced him to take a sobriety test, searched him and his car, where they found $3,000 in cash. The officers proceeded to handcuff him and take him to a motel, where they “warned him not to leave, lest he end up dead.” He attempted to escape but “ran into the police officers, who hit him on the head and broke his shoulder blade,” in addition to telling him, “You’re going to die tonight of a heroin overdose.” While he “previously used a legal drug known as bath salts,” he was not high on bath salts on the night in question. Theirs: He was high on fucking bath salts…you know, bath salts, as in the drug that makes people eat faces? Read more »

So that’s nice. Read more »

According to the police, they found Brian Mulligan high on bath salts after “several” calls had been placed about a man in the area “trying to break into cars” that fit Mulligan’s description. He supposedly told them he was “tired,” which they say is why they drove him to a motel to get some shuteye. When he (allegedly) emerged hours later and started running through traffic despite officers’ orders to get out of the street, later assuming a “fight stance,” they decided it was necessary to deal with him in an aggressive manner. Didn’t want to, felt they owed it to him. According to Mulligan, it was more like this: Read more »

Yesterday afternoon, Deutsche Bank vice chairman and managing director Brian Mulligan filed a claim with the city of Los Angeles, letting it be known that he plans on suing for $50 million, over an altercation with the LAPD that left Mulligan with “a broken shoulder blade and 15 nasal fractures.” According to the media banker, he was minding his own business one night in May, when a couple of officers approached him, asked him what he was doing in the vicinity of a marijuana dispensary, searched his car (where they found a few thousand dollars), drove him to a motel and told him to wait there. Several hours later, still waiting, Mulligan says he started to become suspicious and decided to leave, at which point the officers returned and “began ruthlessly beating him” so badly he “barely looked human” when they were done. If this had happened to you, you might be a little upset too! The LAPD, however, claims that Mulligan has no reason to be angry with them and, in fact, owes the officers an apology, for his “outburst of erratic behavior.” Read more »