Lawsuits

Once upon a time, an Aussie named Robert Bou-Simon worked at London brokerage BGC Partners. In 2005, he left the firm to explore his options elsewhere, and in 2012, rejoined as the head of the basis swaps desk. This time, though, things were different. None of his old buddies were there. There were new names to learn and new faces to remember. Even though he’d worked at BGC for the better half a decade in the early 2000s, people treated him like he was the new guy, and, as the new guy, expected him to take part in a sort of wet t-shirt “initiation” exercise taken very seriously by the staff, who bristled at the idea of someone electing to take a pass, which is where things started to go south for Bou-Simon. Read more »

…and could potentially even get a group rate, between the octogenarian who thinks “By the way, I gave your apartment to another woman” is appropriate pillow talk and this guy: Read more »

As those of you who keep close tabs on the trials and travails of La Familia Falcone know, one of the biggest mistakes Phil made in the last several years was the time he borrowed $113 million from a gated investor fund to cover personal taxes, for which he had failed to set aside enough cash. Falcone learned the hard way that clients don’t take kindly to these sorts of things– even if you pay them back, with interest– and that the Securities and Exchange Commission doesn’t either. Point taken, all that jazz. In retrospect, it might even make sense to Phil re: why people got upset. Having said that, there is no way he, or anyone for that matter, could have predicted anyone would get their panties in a twist over this: Read more »

Reuters reports that earlier today, U.S. District Judge Victor Marrero greenlighted a lawsuit seeking to hold Jon Corzine and the upper echelons of MF Global management responsible for the late firm’s difficulties. But before customers’ lawyers got around to high-fiving and slapping each other on the back, Marrero had some words for them too. The short version: You assholes are on thin ice, too. Read more »

Nobody embarrasses Bank of America but Bank of America! Read more »

Back in 2010, a Glencore trader named Andrew Kearns was fired for what management perceived as a drinking problem, which they believed was affecting Kearns’s ability to do his job. Kearns denied that his drinking was a problem, and filed a wrongful termination suit, seeking $1.2 million. Last month, a judge ruled no dice on the $1.2 million; yesterday he rejected the remaining piece of the claim, which sought a mere $20,000. Where did things go wrong for Kearns? Ultimately, it came down to not seeing eye to eye with his superiors on a number of booze-related issues. Among them:

A debate over the line between being a fall down drunk and merely mixing it up with clients.

  • Kearns, who earned about $500,000 a year “regularly consumed excessive amounts of alcohol,” which meant he was late for work or unable to function effectively, Seymour said in the written decision. Kearns argued during the trial that Glencore’s claims weren’t true and that he had been doing his job by socializing with clients. He denied having an alcohol problem and said the company singled him out because of a disagreement with managers.

The proper way to stage an intervention, and the appropriate response to such a thing.

  • Cohen told the judge that when Glencore offered to help Kearns see an addiction expert, he responded by spending an afternoon in the pub.

Read more »

Martin Klotz, the attorney representing Cohen,* has thrown himself at the mercy of the court and asked, for the umpteenth time, that suit brought by Patrica Cohen– the ex-wife that could– be dismissed. Klotz made the request of U.S. District Judge William Pauley who, if you’re keeping track at home, is the second judge to preside over this case, while the plaintiff is on her third lawyer. Read more »