LIBOR

Deutsche Bank has concluded co-Chief Executive Anshu Jain is clean after an internal investigation into the role of the bank into the manipulation of global interest rates, German newspaper Frankfurter Allgemeine Sonntagszeitung reported. Citing supervisory board sources, the paper reported that the internal probe had cleared Jain of involvement in the Libor scandal after scrutinizing bank documents and interviewing hundreds of Deutsche Bank employees. [Reuters]

Deutsche Bank, Europe’s biggest investment bank by revenue, will review whether to punish senior employees including Alan Cloete for their roles in the interest-rate rigging scandal, according to a person with knowledge of the matter. Deutsche Bank’s supervisory board will discuss punishments early in the week of Jan. 27, said the person, who asked not to be named as the meeting isn’t public. These include firing or disciplining Cloete — who oversaw traders alleged to have sought to rig benchmark rates — and employees responsible for how the bank dealt with the scandal, the person said. The potential sanctions follow a Jan. 5 report in Der Spiegel that German banking regulator Bafin told Deutsche Bank in August that its management and supervisory boards didn’t adequately investigate and address the alleged rate-rigging. The German news magazine didn’t say where it got the information. [Bloomberg]

  • 06 Dec 2013 at 2:06 PM

Bob Diamond To Have A Little Chat Re: Libor

Former Barclays boss Bob Diamond and other past executives at the British bank are set to be called as witnesses next year in a court case relating to the alleged manipulation of Libor interest rates. Barclays is being sued for up to 70 million pounds ($114 million) by Guardian Care Homes, a UK residential care home operator, which alleges the bank mis-sold it interest rate hedging products that were based on Libor…A UK judge on Friday refused Barclays’ attempts to adjourn the trial, which is due to start in April. [Reuters]

The Swiss bank is in the clear when it comes to further fines and all it has to do is rat out all the other banks it knows is engaging in the same thing its own employees have done. Read more »

“Don’t worry mate — there’s bigger crooks in the market than us guys!” the Rabobank yen Libor submitter, identified as Submitter-4 in the filing, said in a Sept. 21, 2007, e-mail, after agreeing to increase its submission to the one-month yen rate by seven basis points from the previous day. Another mid-level manager joked to a colleague seeking help rigging rates: “I am fast turning into your Libor bitch!!!” [Bloomberg]

Time was, RBS had a lax policy on its employees manipulating the price of securities. It wasn’t something management had ever expressed a problem with and certainly no one was going to get fired for doing so, if it was even noticed, which typically it was not. Which is why trader Alex Mallinson felt comfortable engaging in a little market abuse, and why Alex Mallison would’ve continued engaging in a little market abuse, if one guy hadn’t come along and ruined things for the whole group. Read more »

If you’re ready to have LIBOR return to meaning simply “a very important interest rate” rather than “a scandal over a very important but easily-manipulated interest rate that for some reason NYSE Euronext wants responsibility for calculating,” you are out of luck. There are simply too many British regulators desperate to build/rebuild their credibility to allow those dregs to go undrunk. Read more »