Lloyd Blankfein

Ex-SAC Capital PM Mike Steinberg seemed pretty surprised when he was found guilty of insider trading.

Ms. Williams recalled the day when Michael S. Steinberg, a portfolio manager at the hedge fund SAC Capital Advisors, was brought before a Manhattan judge to be read the insider trading charges against him. The police escorted him, in handcuffs, into the Lower Manhattan courthouse through the main elevators rather than the usual back way leading into the courtroom. When Mr. Steinberg emerged from the main elevators, there was a look of utter shock on his face. “Being caught is so out of their wildest dreams,” she said.

Danielle Chiesi was a vision in pink. Read more »


The chief executives of LinkedIn, Ford Motor Company, Northwestern Mutual, Goldman Sachs and Intuit were among the top scorers this year in Glassdoor’s ranking of the leaders at 51 big companies. Yahoo and General Electric anchored the bottom of the list. Glassdoor is a jobs listing website that lets employees anonymously rate their bosses…Lloyd C. Blankfein, who heads Goldman Sachs, came in at No. 8, with a 93 percent approval rating from his underlings. [Dealbook]

  • 11 Feb 2014 at 2:23 PM

Make John Mack’s Day: Give Jamie and Lloyd A Break

In an interview on Bloomberg TV, John J. Mack, the former chairman and chief executive of Morgan Stanley, called for an end to the harsh words that have been hurled at Mr. Dimon and Lloyd C. Blankfein, Goldman Sachs’s chief executive, over their pay…He said he would love to see people “stop beating up on Lloyd and Jamie.” He added: “I think that would make a lot of sense, and I’m in favor of that.” [Dealbook] Read more »

Maybe you’ve been toiling away on Wall Street for 10-15 years but have never earned one ounce of respect. Maybe you’ve been on the job for a matter of months, and have yet to be given more responsibility than picking up your boss’s lunch (a job that you came perilously close to losing several weeks ago for reasons we won’t get into here). Maybe you’ve been working at, say, Goldman Sachs, for several years now and are still addressed as “Hey, you.”

You could put your head down and keep grinding away at the hopes of one day being recognized for your contributions to the financial services industry. You could march up to your boss’s desk one day and say “Hey, I’ve got a name you know!” You could develop of a network of corporate insiders and then give Steve Cohen a call. Or you could simply start forgoing the razor and let your facial hair talk for you. What will it say? That you’re a god damn force to be reckoned with. Read more »


[@cgasparino, related]

Goldman Sachs emerged from the financial crisis as the whipping boy of Wall Street. But on Monday evening, the firm’s chief executive, Lloyd C. Blankfein, was feted like a king. Or perhaps like a rabbi. “Lloyd, I’d like to welcome you to your second bar mitzvah,” David K. Wassong, the co-head of private equity at Soros Fund Management, said at the annual Wall Street Dinner sponsored by the UJA-Federation of New York, a charitable organization focused on Jewish philanthropy. “The only difference is that tonight the money goes to UJA.” [...] For Mr. Blankfein and Gary D. Cohn, the No. 2 at Goldman, the evening reflected the firm’s prominent position on Wall Street and the public relations recovery it has undertaken since the crisis. One financial analyst, Michael Mayo, approached Mr. Cohn after the event and jokingly suggested that the folks at Goldman should send a Hanukkah present to Jamie Dimon, the chief executive of JPMorgan Chase, a bank that has recently fallen from favor in Washington after a number of run-ins with regulators. Mr. Cohn smiled at the suggestion. “I have a joke about that,” he said. But with a reporter present, he declined to tell it. [Dealbook]

As many of you well know, a time-honored tradition on Wall Street is complaining about the size of one’s bonus. It’s a ritual that financial services employees look forward to their whole year and occurs not only in bad times but in good. So cherished is the annual bitching o’ bonuses that even if one is paid an extremely handsome sum, to find out the guy or girl sitting them received $10 or $20 dollars more is to trigger a response that involves angry typing to a colleague about the injustice and a hissy-fit of impotent rage punctuated with threats of considering options elsewhere. According to Lloyd Blankfein, though, Goldman Sachs employees are different and recognize that if they have to make a little less money here and there, it’s for a greater good. Read more »