Lloyd Blankfein

The bank’s Salt Lake office is on a hiring spree. Read more »

Lloyd Blankfein may step down as chief executive of Goldman Sachs as early as this summer; and president and chief operating officer Gary Cohn is the lead candidate to replace him, according to a Goldman executive and a source close to the firm. A Goldman spokesman declined to comment. To be sure, anything can happen over the course of the next few months and the departure of Blankfein, 57, is not certain. It is still up in the air whether Blankfein wants to step down. It would also not be unheard of for Blankfein to share the role of CEO, as so many others at Goldman have in the past. Former co-heads include John Weinberg and John Whitehead; Robert Rubin and Stephen Friedman; and Jon Corzine and Henry Paulson. … It seems increasingly certain that Gary Cohn would replace Blankfein. [Fortune, earlier, earlier]

  • 19 Oct 2011 at 3:51 PM

Caption Contest Wednesday: A Play In Two Acts


[via NYSD]

  • 27 Sep 2011 at 11:57 AM
  • Banks

Morgan Stanley Joins Goldman Sachs In FirmScaping

Back in August, it was revealed that Goldman Sachs had added a disturbing element to its cost-cutting efforts: plant murder. The lobby philodendrons? Gone. Boston Ferns by the elevator? To the dumpster. The third floor Geraniums that lined the windows? Left for dead.

The While every bank on Wall Street is bracing for serious reductions in staff, compensation and “extras,” Goldman had been the only one to date that choose to commit genocide to help its bottom line. Employees were, understandably, shocked by the decision, which reportedly “provoked disquiet at the bank,” with some putting their jobs on the line to “block the move, leading to a stand-off between the plant pickers and staff. In some cases, a solution was found only after employees agreed to sign forms guaranteeing to take responsibility for particular plants.”

At the time, other institutions scoffed at the seemingly heartless move to save a few bucks, claiming you’d never catch them following suit. And yet? According to the Times, Goldman is not alone. Read more »

Jamie Dimon of JPMorgan Chase launched a tirade at Mark Carney, Bank of Canada governor, in a closed-door meeting in front of more than two dozen bankers and finance officials, underscoring mounting tensions between bankers and officials over financial regulation. The JPMorgan chief executive’s remarks to Mr Carney, who is touted as a potential next head of the Financial Stability Forum, the international group of regulators, were focused on a capital surcharge for the largest banks, according to several people who attended the meeting of about 30 bank chiefs…Mr Dimon told Mr Carney that many of the rules discriminated against US banks and he was going to continue to use the phrase “anti-American” because it seemed to resonate with people who might be able to modify the reforms. The atmosphere was so bad after the meeting that Lloyd Blankfein, chief executive of Goldman Sachs and head of the Financial Services Forum bankers’ group which arranged the session, emailed the central banker to try to smooth relations, people familiar with the matter said. [FT via BI]

John F. W. Rogers, some say, is “the single most powerful person at Goldman Sachs,” and has been for the last decade. The man behind the man behind the man. The Wizard of GS. The guy who Lloyd Blankfein was actually referring to when he said “We’re just doing god’s work.” Known as a “master tactician with a long record of behind-the-scenes accomplishments…for whom invisibility is part of a master plan,” Rogers, who came to the firm from Washington in 1994 with zero Wall Street experience, is an executive officer who sits on the management committee and has served as “chief of staff” to three CEOs: Blankfein, Paulson and Corzine, JSC being his first, on the recommendation of Bob Rubin. While his title is somewhat vague, Rogers is known as “the foremost guardian of Goldman’s partnership culture,” a man with not just gold-plated balls but crystal ones (“He said there would be some investigations and we would likely be the primary focus,” says Lucas van Praag. “He was right.”) and the guy you don’t want to fuck with (“If wronged, his vengeance can kill careers.”). Not convinced? Then answer this: would a guy with anything less than god-like power be able to pull off this? Read more »

In a recent interview with New York, Lloyd Blankfein said “I’m tired of [Charlie] Gasparino. I wish he would quit.” Chaz apparently caught wind of Blankfein’s wish, and earlier this afternoon, took to Twitter to respond. Read more »