Loans

Today, a company called Sexy Business Funding posted a Web video advertisement in which a husky-voiced narrator named Ca$handra offers loans of as much as $750,000 while images of exotic dancers, jars of marijuana, and piles of hundred-dollar bills flash across the screen. The idea is to entice owners of strip clubs, pot dispensaries, tattoo shops, and other businesses that may scare off traditional Main Street lenders. “Sexy Business Funding recognizes adult businesses as legitimate, law-abiding companies that deserve the same borrowing opportunities as any other business from any other industry,” the company said in a press release…The company has provided $43 million in financing to 1,420 businesses, according to its website. [BusinessWeek] Read more »

Early this year, a New York State Lottery winner in Brooklyn approached Morgan Stanley with a problem: he needed to borrow hundreds of thousands of dollars before he collected his prize money. The man, a Russian immigrant, wanted money to help move his family to a secure location before he redeemed his ticket and possibly became famous, according to people familiar with the matter who spoke on the condition of anonymity. He also wanted advice about what to do with his prize money, which was in the hundreds of thousands of dollars. The bank’s wealth management unit decided to make the loan to win a new customer, a step it is increasingly willing to make as it builds up its brokerage unit…Industry sources said they had never heard of a loan against a lottery ticket, though they cited other examples of atypical collateral that other banks have loaned against, including a client in Texas who borrowed against the future offspring of his prize bulls, and a client who borrowed against future ticket sales of a professional sports team he owned. [Reuters]

  • 10 Jul 2014 at 5:44 PM

Greg Smith-Lite Wants To Lend You Some Money

Steven Mandis knows what we’re talking about. Read more »

Back in 2009, hedge fund manager Phil Falcone came up with an idea considered genius only if you take an elastic view of securities laws, which Falcone certainly did (does?). Upon being notified by his personal accountants that he owed the government more than $100 million in state and federal taxes, and turning down the suggestion to borrow against various assets including his Manhattan townhouses, artwork, interest in the Minnesota Wild, and an estate on St. Bart’s, Falcone decided to just borrow the money from a gated investor fund, despite being told in no uncertain terms it was a bad idea by Harbinger’s “longstanding” outside counsel. Investors in that fund turned out not to like the idea very much, with the SEC feeling similarly. But while the regulator felt 5 years (plus an $18 million fine) was enough time for Falcone to really think about what he’d done– a punishment Falcone described as a blessing in disguise–, the New York Department of Financial Services felt otherwise. Read more »

  • 11 Jul 2013 at 3:05 PM

Deutsche Bank Did Some Accounting Stuff

I used to work in a business that, among other things, helped clients get financing against securities. One thing that you learn quickly in that business, and then spend the rest of your career trying to forget, is that the simplest way to get financing against securities is to sell them. You’ve got $100 of stock and want to borrow $80 of cash against it? Just sell the stock, now you have $100, you’re welcome.1

This is not a perfect solution, of course, because you presumably owned the stock for a reason, and that reason was presumably that you thought it would go up.2 And if you sell it you lose the chance to participate in that upside. So one thing you could do is (1) sell your stock for $100 today and (2) enter into some sort of transaction that gives you some or all of the upside in the stock over some period of time. Like, you could buy a call option struck at $100, giving you all the upside and none of the downside, though at the cost of having to pay premium for the call option. Or you could enter into a total return swap struck at $100, giving you all of the upside and all of the downside at a zero-ish cost. Or you could enter into a forward contract to buy back the stock, which is the same as the swap, more or less. That last one – sell stock today, enter into a forward to buy it back in the future – is so common that it has a name, and the name is “repo.” Read more »

  • 20 Jun 2013 at 6:26 PM

IMF Will Continue To Throw Greece A Bone

The International Monetary Fund said Thursday that it would continue to finance Greece as long as it is able to complete a review of the cash-strapped country’s finances by the end of July as expected. The statement by the Washington-based multilateral lender came in response to reports that several European central banks were refusing to roll-over loans to Greece, something that could create a shortfall in Greece’s financing. A media report said the IMF had warned European countries that it would cease lending to Greece as early as July if the funding gap wasn’t filled. [WSJ]

The Financial Industry Regulatory Authority accused Washington-based Success Trade Securities and its 45-year-old founder, Fuad Ahmed, of lying to 58 investors — most of them current and former NFL and NBA players — about how he planned to use their money. Ahmed sold $18 million in promissory notes to investors without telling them how he was spending it, including a $1,300-a-month lease for his Range Rover and an $82,000 interest-free loan for his brother, according to a complaint. Finra slapped the securities firm with a temporary cease-and-desist order while it investigates. [NYP]