loyalty

Paulson And Co Investors Standing By Their Man


John Paulson, the billionaire hedge- fund manager having the worst year of his career, has received less than 10 percent in redemption requests for his Recovery and Credit Opportunities funds for year’s end, according to two people familiar with the firm. Withdrawal orders for those two funds, which together managed about $15 billion as of July 31, were due at the end of September and may give some indication of what total redemptions could be across all of Paulson’s funds, the worst-performing of which has tumbled 47 percent this year…“We’re going to give Paulson the benefit of the doubt,” said Trip Kuehne, founder of Double Eagle Capital Management LP, a Dallas-based firm that has invested with Paulson since 2005. “I believe in him and his firm and don’t plan to pull my money.” [Bloomberg]

Because Mike Bloomberg believes in a little something called loyalty. Read more »

  • 11 Jun 2010 at 10:45 AM

David Viniar Stands By His Man

Perhaps some of you remember Jon Winkelried? The former Goldman Sachs co-president is persona non grata at the firm but for the purposes of context, a quick refresh: Winkelried was the good for nothing prick who abandoned Lloyd Blankfein when the CEO needed him most, and when it would look most bad for the company to have a high level departure (circa the shit hitting the fan era). A traitorous shrew, really, who let deaf ears fall on Blankfein’s pleas to stay, and who traded it all in for a bunch of barnyard animals.

Anywho, Goldman ended up getting on just fine with out he whose name shall not be mentioned, got on great in fact, but his actions did leave a lasting mark on Blankfein, namely that he lost the ability to open up and trust high level execs and that his previously dormant abandonment issues flared up like nobody’s business. So when there was talk of Goldman CFO David “Bones” Viniar retiring, Lloyd naturally panicked. But apparently it was for naught. Bones would never do that to his li’l fella. Read more »