meat

Strip-steakKnown inside Merrill as the “wellness initiative,” Thiel has been advocating his employees embrace a New Age cultural lifestyle that includes meditation and drinking wheatgrass and cucumber juice during firm gathering…But at the meeting on Tuesday night, without Thiel present, the old Thundering Herd, as Merrill’s brokers are known, was back on display. Speeches from management included testimonials about veteran brokers, and remarks about financial markets. Also noticeably absent: Any trace of wheatgrass or cucumber juice on the menu, or any of the so-called wellness gurus or new age lifestyle experts Thiel featured at past events. Instead, brokers feasted on “meat, potatoes and booze,” according to one person who was present. “It’s the way you’re supposed to feed the Thundering Herd.” [FBN, related, related]

“This year, my personal challenge is around being thankful for the food I have to eat. I think many people forget that a living being has to die for you to eat meat, so my goal revolves around not letting myself forget that and being thankful for what I have. This year I’ve basically become a vegetarian since the only meat I’m eating is from animals I’ve killed myself…[my] first kill was a lobster, which I boiled alive. The most interesting thing was how special it felt to eat it after having not eaten any seafood or meat in a while…on May 4…I killed a pig and a goat [by] cutting the throat of the goat with a knife, which is the most kind way to do it.”

Was it: Read more »

Or will he be forced to get fellow vegan Natalie Portman to vouch for him? (That photo of LVP up to his elbows in ribs at Dinosaur BBQ was a fake!)

Don’t Blame Goldman Sachs for the Food Crisis: Blame the meat-loving middle class.

By Lucas Van Praag

Frederick Kaufman’s article “How Goldman Sachs Created the Food Crisis,” ignores a number of important facts about the underlying economic, social, and political factors that have driven the rise in food prices.

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Two months ago, in light of the possibility that the majority of your bonuses would be paid out in stock this year, Smith & Wollensky took out the following ad in the New York Times. Read more »