MEREDITH WHITNEY

“There’s a long list of failed managers who look to raise money off of one correct market call made in the past, so no, I’m passing on this one,” said Brad Balter, founder of $1.2 billion Balter Capital Management, which invests in non-brand-name hedge funds and alternative mutual funds. “This feels much less like a passionate manager launching a fund and more like an attempt to find another source of income post her old firm shuttering. Plus there are thousands of long-short equity hedge funds out there already—who needs another?” he added. “It’s moving from a headache (clients) to a stomach ache (managing money)—but in her case it will be more like a full-on flu virus as she’s managing headlines and the pains of managing a portfolio,” one family office investor said via email. “She had a big call and hasn’t availed herself since.” [NetNet, earlier]

Does that sound like something you’d be interested in? Read more »

  • 09 Oct 2013 at 5:05 PM

Meredith Whitney (Advisory Group) Has Packed It In

…Meredith Whitney the person, however, is nowhere near finished here. For those fearing the closing of the Dollar Dominatrix’s brokerage shop meant the end of MW in your life: fear not. The woman who haunts Vikram Pandit’s dreams will never leave you. Read more »

Things are looking pretty grim for Meredith Whitney Advisory Group. Except possibly from Bermuda. Read more »

  • 16 Oct 2012 at 3:57 PM

Meredith Whitney: Citigroup Should Just Give Up

Earlier today, we wondered if, in light of the news that Vikram Pandit had resigned as CEO of Citigroup, analyst Meredith Whitney’s opinion of the bank had changed. Choice comments that Whitney has made about the Big C in the past have included: “Citigroup is in such a mess Stephen Hawking couldn’t turn this company around“; “Citi is like an old broken-down Victorian house“; and Citi “has no earnings power, isn’t going to grow, hasn’t been investable in four years.” She also once told Maria Bartiromo that the only way she’d change her mind about company would be if she received “a new brain.” Still, sometimes analysts change their tune when new blood is brought in and, like former FDIC chair Sheila Bair, perhaps some of her beef with the bank had been a personal dislike of Uncle V. Now that he’s gone, is she seeing Citigroup in a new light? Read more »

The way Whitney sees it, some kind of sugar daddy or “rich uncle” setup is Morgan Stanley’s only hope for survival going forward. Read more »