Mervyn King

Aspiring M.B.A.s and lawyers should gird themselves for a stern talking-to when Lord King of Lothbury comes to town. Read more »

The soon-to-be-former Bank of England governor’s got a lot of problems with your people. And now, you’re gonna hear about it. Again. Read more »

Mervyn King is leaving the Bank of England in a couple of months, and he’s got nothing to lose. So he’s spitting in George Osborne’s eye, blaming RBS for bollocking up the British economy and calling for a Solomonic solution to the problem. Read more »

  • 15 Jan 2013 at 2:48 PM
  • Banks

Goldman Exits A Tax Trade Early

Here is an important cultural difference between the US and the UK that you should, like, stick in the boot of your lorry or whatever: in the UK, it’s apparently not socially acceptable to put off paying bonuses by two months to save your employees five percentage points in taxes. In America, it’s considered perfectly reasonable to die to avoid a tax increase.1

I was not aware of this difference and it seems neither was Goldman Sachs:

Goldman Sachs has backed down from a plan to delay UK bonus payments until after the new UK tax year, which would have allowed bankers to benefit from a cut in the top rate of tax from 50 to 45 per cent. … The idea – first reported by the Financial Times on Sunday – would have seen the payment of the deferred portion of bonuses from prior years delayed from February until after April 6.

News of the plan prompted a flurry of criticism from lawmakers and even from within the banking industry.

Addressing the House of Commons Treasury select committee earlier on Tuesday, Sir Mervyn King, governor of the Bank of England, had criticised the idea.

“I find it a bit depressing that people who earn so much find it would be even more exciting to adjust their payouts to benefit from the tax rate, knowing that this must have an impact on the rest of society, which is suffering most from the consequences of the financial crisis,” Sir Mervyn told MPs. “I think it would be rather clumsy and lacking in care and attention to how other people might react. And in the long run, financial institutions do depend on goodwill from society,” he added.

You can sympathize with Goldman’s misunderstanding here, no? Read more »