Mohamed El-Erian

Earlier today, it was reported that the Securities and Exchange Commission has been “investigating whether bond fund manager Pimco inflated the returns of its Total Return Exchange-Traded Fund run by founder Bill Gross.” The probe is said to have sped up in recent weeks but has been going on for “at least a year.” Which means that it was happening when Mohamed El-Erian announced he was leaving the firm. Which means that it’s possible not all but some of Bill Gross’s behavior surrounding El-Erian’s departure could be attributed to stress related to the look-see by the SEC, a theory we decided to explore further. Our findings:

* Enforcing total silence on the trading floor with the expectation that Pimco employees will neither speak to, look at, or breathe in his general direction: Gross has long been known to run the trading floor at Pimco with a “Before you even think to open your mouth, shut the fuck up” policy. This was not a new development. Survey says: can’t be blamed on the investigation. Read more »

Remember, back in January, when Pimco co-CEO Mohamed El-Erian announced he was leaving the firm, and founder Bill Gross lost his mind? And did things like call up people at Reuters and demand they report that El-Erian had ghost written a Wall Street Journal article about tension at the firm, as part of a campaign to “undermine” Gross? And “indicated that [he knew this because] he had been monitoring El-Erian’s phone calls”? And when he couldn’t convince anyone to print the story, snapped “You’re on his side. Great, he’s got you, too, wrapped around his charming right finger”? And then went on Bloomberg TV and demanded El-Erian violate his NDA by meeting Gross in a public forum and telling him to his face why he left (even though Gross really kind of already knew)? And was more or less forced to take remedial classes re: how to be okay with people looking him in the eye and speaking to him in general? In an interview earlier this week, El-Erian said he did not see any of this coming, even from Secretariat. Read more »

  • 13 May 2014 at 3:11 PM

Bill Gross Not Yet Ready To Let A Certain Someone Go

Last month, Pimco deputy chief investment officer Scott Mather announced that the “new normal,” a phrase created by Pimco founder Bill Gross and former CEO Mohamed El-Erian, was no longer. “Our view is that what you’ll see in next the few years is we’re going to head back to a new destination,” Maher said in an interview with Bloomberg Surveillance. It was assumed that Maher made the proclamation with the full backing of Gross, and, what’s more, that it came about as a result of Gross’s feelings for his collaborator El-Erian, who quit in February and who Gross, after a series of outbursts regarding the departure, was ready to declare dead to him, along with the phrase. Apparently, though, Maher spoke too soon. Read more »

Or so he says. Read more »

Why Mohamed? Why? Read more »

  • 10 Apr 2014 at 4:27 PM

Bill Gross Wants El-Erian To Say It To His Face

Gross, speaking in an interview with Bloomberg Television’s Trish Regan today, said El-Erian’s departure is still a mystery for him and a disappointment for the firm, which manages the world’s biggest bond fund. “I would say, ‘Come on, Mohamed, tell us why’,” Gross said in the interview. [Bloomberg, earlier]

As those of you who follow the news out of Newport Beach, California know, the past couple months have not been the best for Bill Gross. First, Pimco co-CEO Mohammed El-Erian announced that he would be parting ways with the bond giant. Then, the Wall Street Journal detailed his “What the fuck are you looking at” management style, in an article that also revealed Gross’s nickname for himself: Secretariat. Next, Reuters refused to print his theory that El-Erian had penned the Journal story himself, and instead made him not look great by quoting him as saying that El-Erian was waging a campaign to undermine him and that ME-E had Reuterswrapped around his charming right finger.” Along the way, people have offered up suggestions re: how you solve a problem like Bill Gross, which have included not investing with him, slashing his $200 million/year salary, teaching him remedial strategies for acting like a sentient human being who would not admonish someone for daring to look him in the eye and, most recently, putting him out to pasture. Read more »