Money Never Sleeps

  • 27 Jun 2014 at 4:05 PM

Shia LaBeouf Had A Busy Thursday Night

Troublemaking actor Shia LaBeouf chased after a homeless man — demanding he hand over a McDonald’s bag in Times Square — a few hours before he went berserk at the Broadway musical “Cabaret,” new video footage reveals. “He really wanted whatever was in that bag. He had so much focus … If there were French fries in the bag, maybe he really wanted to eat them,” a witness said. He added, “He was dodging people and yelling, ‘Yo, come on!’ … He was on a mission. It was so bizarre.” [NYP, earlier, earlier]

  • 10 Jan 2014 at 1:57 PM

You Won’t Have Shia LaBeouf To Kick Around Anymore

Former “Transformers” star Shia LaBeouf seems to have reached his breaking point. After a series of controversies, the actor has announced he is stepping out of the public eye. “In light of the recent attacks against my artistic integrity, I am retiring from all public life,” the 27-year-old actor, tweeted in the early morning hours of Friday. “My love goes out to those who have supported me. #stopcreating.” [NYP]

Remember Tommy Belesis? Founder and CEO of preeminent boiler room John Thomas Financial? Breakout star of Wall Street 2: Money Never Sleeps? Mentor to Shia Labeouf? Guy who enforces rules at his shop about not letting junior employees sit down, who has cultivated an atmosphere in which senior brokers rub the balls of a bull every morning for good luck and walk around saying things like “motion creates emotion” without any irony, and who generally gives the impression he proudly displays towels in his guest bath that have been hand-stitched with the phrase “Don’t pitch the bitch,” which he make sure to point out during house tours? This may come as a surprise, as it seems so out of character, but he’s been charged with fraud and intimidation that in one instance involved suggesting an employee ought to look both ways before crossing the street. Read more »

Who could have seen this coming, besides everyone? Read more »

Back in February, FINRA informed John Thomas Financial founder Anastasios “Tommy” Belesis, he of rallies for Wall Street and Wall Street 2: Money Never Sleeps fame, that he “may face disciplinary action on a claim that he artificially inflated the price of a stock,” while the Post reported that the firm was being probed by the FBI and the SEC. According to the firm’s lawyer, Robert Bursky, “There is not a shred of evidence that suggests there is an ongoing inquiry by the FBI,” and if you asked David Pitts, a spokesman for John Thomas, if the brokerage is a boiler room, which Bloomberg did, he’d say it is not (and that, on the contrary, “it helps real companies raise money and provides honest advice to investors”). Regardless of whether or not any of the allegations are true, a few business practices one might want to avoid if questions like “is this place legit” or “is this business entirely modeled after 2000’s Boiler Room” are being raised include: Read more »

Shia LaBeouf was escorted out of the LA opening of The Box nightclub by security Friday night after a confrontation with a pal of shock rocker Marilyn Manson [after LaBeouf “picked up a water bottle…and started spitting it all over his tablemates, including Marilyn Manson“]. The “Transformers” star “exchanged terse words with a friend of Manson’s, who lunged over the table at Shia, and Shia lunged back. “Two security guards led Shia out holding his hands behind his head. Outside, he fell onto a barricade. Swearing, he picked himself up and ran off.” Despite numerous witnesses at the party, also attended by Jon Hamm, Lindsay Lohan and Chelsea Handler, Shia’s rep said: “[He] actually left the club early as planned … he went to see one of the bands performing in the showcase and left after they finished … exiting through a crowded room was apparently misinterpreted. No altercation occurred.” [NYP, earlier]

  • 27 Sep 2010 at 2:34 PM

Goldman Analyst: We’re Dreamers, Too

I don’t think LaBeouf’s character [who attempted to raise capital for an alternative-energy company] was unrealistic from a personality standpoint. More Wall Street people than you’d think have that kind of beneath-the-surface idealism.“– Anonymous Goldman analyst, in a conversation with Dealbook discussing how “real” things are in Money Never Sleeps. The same financial services employee noted that “there were too many ties” and said he thought “the percentage of scenes that Jake wasn’t in the office was way off.” [Dealbook via DI]

The culture of the employees, the trading floor [as depicted in Money Never Sleeps]…I thought all that was pretty good, though some of the machines looked funky. And those equity guys were portrayed very accurately, like the lugheads that that know their stories on a couple of [stocks]. At Lehman the difference between equity floor and the fixed income floor was like night and day. It’s like the Harvard, MIT crowd in fixed income and then it’s like UMass on the equity floor. So many equity guys totally got blind-sided. They didn’t understand credit derivatives, and they just were so wrapped up in their own little stories.– Lawrence McDonald, managing director at Pangea Capital, previously VP of distressed debt and convertible securities trading at Lehman Brothers, and guy for whom the Wall Street sequel was “hard to watch” because it “brought back a lot of bad memories.” [TDB]