NBD

  • 20 Aug 2014 at 7:09 PM

Pimco Not Sweating “Isolated Issue With Insects”

The New York offices of Pimco, the massive asset manager run by Bill Gross, are being fumigated this week because of a bed bug infestation. “Our New York office is addressing an isolated issue with insects, and as a precautionary measure the firm is fumigating certain areas of the office space,” a spokesman said on Wednesday. “During this period, our employees are working remotely, and we expect to resume full on-premises staffing over the coming days.” Pimco’s New York offices, located in the Paramount Plaza on 1633 Broadway, are one of a dozen global locations. Pimco, a unit of Allianz SE, has its headquarters in Newport Beach, Calif. “This is an issue that is far from uncommon in New York City,” the spokesman said, regarding New York City’s battle with the epidemic of tiny blood-sucking insects. [Reuters, earlier]

As you may have heard, yesterday Credit Suisse paid a $2.6 billion fine and pleaded guilty to doing the thing that Swiss banks were put on this earth to do– helping American clients avoid paying taxes by hiding their assets from the IRS. Now, some people might worry that copping to engaging in years of highly illegal activity would cause clients and counterparties to look at the bank differently. In fact, CEO Brady Dougan was one of those people, which caused him to get on the horn and conduct a small poll to see if anyone would have trouble doing business with Credit Suisse moving forward. The great news is that apparently no one gives a shit. Read more »

  • 02 May 2014 at 4:20 PM
  • Banks

But Who Will Jürgen Fitschen And Anshu Jain Hang Out With?

Deutsche Bank’s CEOs will still be allowed to show their faces at the St. Petersburg International Economic Forum, because German businessmen—familiar as they are with protecting their own abroad—don’t see any reason why imperial irredentism should get in the way of making money. But they’re gonna have a hard time finding other bank chiefs to have caviar fights with. Read more »

To settle a barrage of government legal actions over the last year, JPMorgan Chase has agreed to penalties that now total $20 billion, a sum that could cover the annual education budget of New York City or finance the Yankees’ payroll for 100 years. It is also a figure that most of the nation’s banks could not withstand if they had to pay it. But since the financial crisis, JPMorgan has become so large and profitable that it has been able to weather the government’s legal blitz, which has touched many parts of the bank’s sprawling operations. The latest hit to JPMorgan came on Tuesday, when federal prosecutors imposed a $1.7 billion penalty on the bank for failing to report Bernard L. Madoff’s suspicious activities to the authorities. Yet JPMorgan’s shares are up 28 percent over the last 12 months. Wall Street analysts estimate that it will earn as much as $23 billion in profit this year, more than any other lender. And JPMorgan’s investment bankers, who on average earned $217,000 in 2012, can look forward to another lush payday as bonus season approaches. “The fines have been manageable in the context of the bank’s earnings capacity,” Jason Goldberg, a bank analyst at Barclays, said. “It makes $25 billion in revenue per quarter and has record capital.” [Dealbook]

Late last month, a guy named Jim Bisenius was surfing the web when he came across an advertisement for a prostitute. “I like prostitutes,” Jim probably thought to himself and proceeded to contact the woman at the number she had listed in the ad. Unfortunately for Jim, the ad turned out to be a decoy and the woman on the other end turned out to be a cop. Will this affect his criminal record? One would think so, yes. Will it affect his position at Common Sense Investment Capital, the firm he founded in 1991? According to CSIM, no.

For more than two decades, Common Sense Investment Management (CSIM) has brought superior risk adjusted returns to our investors and clients. CSIM’s success is about a team of committed and driven investment professionals; not one individual. Jim Bisenius’ recent personal transgression bears no reflection on this outstanding team of professionals or the quality of portfolio management at CSIM. Going forward, the firm’s partners have decided that Jim will remain in his role as Chief Executive Officer and Chief Investment Officer and he will deal with this recent event as the personal matter that it is. Our investment process and decision making will continue to be made by our investment committee, which is comprised of our President, four Portfolio Managers, Director of Operational Due Diligence, Director of Risk Management and myself. All management decisions continue to be made by the management team. We look forward to building on CSIM’s successful 22-year track record and creating value for our investors.

Relatedly, if you’re wondering if Jimbo is the type of guy who would define marriage as the union between one man and (at least) two women, the first being his wife, the second being the woman he thought was a hooker, the answer is come on, of course he is. Read more »

  • 07 Aug 2013 at 1:35 PM

Some Exchanges Had Some Problems Yesterday

Nobody noticed. Read more »

Paulson Gold Fund Continues To Build Upside Potential

Down 65% this year after losing another 23% in June, JP&Co. can’t quite say that there’s no place to go but up. So they’ll say this: Read more »